dontletmepost
10691
3 days ago

Oh thank fuck. If it had to be rebuilt entirely it could have been many decades. At least we might live to see it restored now.

ecyrblim
4619
3 days ago

This is better news than I'd hoped for, along with the fact that the crown of thorns and other relics were saved.

myxanders
3147
3 days ago

Ya after the safety of the people I was most concerned with the relics. I’m not Catholic anymore but having been raised on Catholic education I understand how invaluable some of those are, especially the crown of thorns.

derstherower
1688
3 days ago

This is so surreal to see happening. Whenever a tragedy like this happens I immediately think of the people, but this time I just thought "God I hope they're able to save the art and relics inside". It took me like a few minutes to remember that there were a ton of people inside the building. I never thought something like this could happen in this day and age.

AdmiralRed13
1203
3 days ago

Thankfully the fire started about ten minutes after it was closed to the public for the day.

ComradeShyGuy
843
3 days ago

Probably one of the biggest reasons we don't thankfully have a body count. There are thousands of people going through.

AdmiralRed13
557
3 days ago

I feel so bad for the firefighters caught in traffic and by the logjam of people. That must have been infuriating watching it burn while stuck.

willpc14
379
3 days ago

They really couldn't do anything to stop it though. The building is just too big to make any sort of safe and effective attack on the fire.

katarh
499
3 days ago

They can use this opportunity to install modern fire safety systems though.

naked_plums
144
3 days ago

Exactly what I was thinking.

v-tigris
17
3 days ago

It WILL change fire prevention practices and access in Paris for similar places. Hopefully in other towns and cities with significant cultural heritage too.

thejawa
14
3 days ago

It's kind of a pick you poison situation. Anything modern that could quickly suppress a fire is also something that would also likely destroy whatever the fire would have destroyed except the building itself.

LlannaLee
57
3 days ago

I hope that he (or she) is able to have a quick and total recovery.

ICUMTARANTULAS
13
3 days ago

Idk, if you’ve ever been burned you should know how bad it takes to heal. Even a light steam burn makes hot showered near unbearable.

Ogre213
20
3 days ago

It’s not necessarily a burn; orthopedic injuries are very common in firefighting, as well as hyper- and hypothermia. Not that those aren’t worrisome, but I’d take just about anything over a burn.

vonBoomslang
112
3 days ago

At the risk of sounding extremely callous, I find it absolutely natural to be more worried for the heritage than the people because, ultimately, it's much more likely to outlive the people and is far more irreplaceable.

dogtotem
34
3 days ago

Let's be careful not to overstate the value of objects, as humans tend to do. People live and breathe and they feel pain and loss - objects don't, as irreplaceable as they may be.

StabbyPants
16
3 days ago

objects help ground us in history. witness the fallout from destruction of culture

Stereotype_Apostate
25
3 days ago

We have like 20 more Janets in a twelve block radius, save the painting!

ShittingBalls
13
3 days ago

Beautifully said. Thanks for a moment of profound reflection.

Viking_Mana
120
3 days ago

Back when IS were still a really big deal, what really stuck with me was this one video of them jackhammering well-preserved ancient ruins in their mission to wipe out pre-islamic culture in the middle east.

I'm definitely glad that everyone's been relatively safe throughout all of this - but as a historian, the total loss of a cultural heritage site like the Notre Dame, and the pieces preserved within, would've been nothing short of heartbreaking. Had they had to rebuild it from the ground up its soul would've been lost - and the treasures within are irreplacable, religious or not.

UnbalancedMint
109
3 days ago

I thought this - Over 800 years old meaning it stood for well over 700 years without any kind of fire suppression system or even alarms, when everyone relied on naked flames for light. Then in 2019 this happens. So sad! One of the epicentres of European history just destroyed like that.

BoarHide
27
3 days ago

To be honest, in a time when there was only naked flame, people were a lot more used to being careful with them. Fires don’t happen nowadays, ever, to the average person. Most people in the first world have fires when camping, that’s it. Our cities don’t burn down in their entirety anymore from one toppled candle or one spark from a jackhammer

MetalRetsam
14
3 days ago

without any kind of fire suppression system

Masonry. That's the Medieval equivalent of a fire suppression system, of a lifelong guarantee. I mean, are there any wooden Medieval buildings left in Paris?

OHoSPARTACUS
18
3 days ago

you couldnt ask anyone to give their life for it but you can bet there are people who were more than willing to.

vipergirl
167
3 days ago

I am an American and raised as a Protestant, and the heritage and art exemplified in Norte Dame or any cathedral for that matter is a huge part of our civilization. I'd never want to hear about their demise.

jgandfeed
14
3 days ago

You are exactly right. I mean no matter how anyone feels about the Catholic church you cant deny that Notre Dame has immense artistic, architectural, historical, and cultural value in addition to its religious importance.

Megalocerus
101
3 days ago

I remember visiting the church--it means Paris to me more than the Eiffel Tower. This was horrible.

I was in Germany last year--they rebuilt a lot after WWII. Maybe it will come back.

josh6466
92
3 days ago

The cathedral in Cologne was damaged almost as bad after the war. While the Allies largely avoided it, the bridge nearby over the Rhine was bombed heavily. After the war it had to be demolished as it was unsafe. Unfortunately the shock from the blast was enough to cause large parts of the rid to collapse. The cathedral is in excellent shape now.

Notre Dame will get rebuilt. It will take a long time, and it will be expensive, but it will be rebuilt

Fantasy_masterMC
26
3 days ago

And thanks to 3D-scanning technology we'll be able to fully replicate it with high accuracy.

OHoSPARTACUS
29
3 days ago

We easily have the technological means to make this the most faithful reproduction of any destroyed landmark ever. I cant think of many more buildings with more documentation of its structure than Notre Dame.

pperca
552
3 days ago

It took just 200 years to build it the first time. I'm sure we can go faster now.

el_muchacho
484
3 days ago

The restoration will take decades, that's for sure.

JimmyPD92
403
3 days ago

Two decades, apparently. Given the structure itself, the bell towers and two of the three windows (or is at least well documented), it's mostly the structural woodwork that is gone. Plus whatever damage has been done to the floor, but that has been damaged and repaired before.

Given the extensive 3D modelling and documentation of that building, nothing is lost to time. However one window is now entirely unrecoverable. It'll be very interesting to see how the extensive modelling will aid reconstruction.

Edit - Btw a lot of stained glass breaks not from the fire, but from rapidly cooling down when hit by water during the firefight. Wasn't a factor here as far as I'm aware, but just something someone might find interesting.

Descentguy284
218
3 days ago

The stained glass windows have almost certainly been photographed in extensive detail. 1:1 reproductions will be built

Torvaldr
192
3 days ago

Dude imagine they made a 2:1 reproductions and it was rebuilt twice as big?

boomhaeur
77
3 days ago

2,000 years later... "Okay guys, we're just going to have to bulldoze what's left of Paris at this point, fucking /u/torvaldr and his 'you can destroy it but we'll just build it again twice as big' approach. We really have to protect this sixth iteration of the building or its goodbye France"

algag
16
3 days ago

Or 1:1000 reproductions. "What is this? A rose window for ants?!"

stinker_beall
30
3 days ago

If it completely collapsed they wouldn't be able to rebuild it. We don't have nearly enough skilled stone workers. There is a reason you don't see new cathedrals as intricate and as monolithic as this one and others like it.

Krabban
493
3 days ago

There is a reason you don't see new cathedrals as intricate and as monolithic as this one and others like it.

The reason is cost, not lack of ability/skill.

If the middle ages had reinforced concrete and heavy lifting cranes no cathedral in Europe would've been built with carved stone blocks by hand over 200 years. Modern builders absolutely could replicate the cathedral, even brick by brick if needed (Provided plans of course), it would simply be prohibitively expensive.

some_random_noob
205
3 days ago

no, clearly we knew more about working stone way back then than we'll ever know now and we might as well head to the winchester, have a pint, and wait for this to all blow over.

dumbcorrectivelenses
14
3 days ago

The fucking Winchester?!

theLoveGiant
81
3 days ago

Yeah, their argument makes no sense. Stonemasons are more rare now because it's an expensive practice that is hardly used anymore. It's not like we forgot how.

versusgorilla
23
3 days ago

Right? And we would also have access to all the stone masons on Earth now.

France puts out a call for stone masons to do work on Notre Dame, you're telling me some mason in New Zealand isn't gonna answer that call?

Nah, they can rebuild it if they want too. Just need support and money.

Fantasy_masterMC
25
3 days ago

That, and we don't have a particular reason, since there's not really a market for incredibly intricate stonework designs. Even if the skills to carve it by hand are practically non-existent we have the technology to use computer-guided carving methods now. It won't be quite 3D-printing, but it'll be something of similar detail levels.

SoulAgony
12
3 days ago

Right? Like who is building cathedrals every day? It's not like they're in high demand.

Wolf6120
32
3 days ago

Also, massive, monolithic structures in ancient styles like this still very much ARE being built in the modern era, in spite of the costs, they're just not being built as much in the West. That might simply be because we already have so many giant cathedrals and palaces for the most part, and it's easier to just maintain and renovate those every few decades instead of building new ones (though ironically those renovation attempts are often what cause accidents like the one at Notre Dame to occur). Even so, there's a number of classic-looking Cathedrals and churches that were built as recently as the last 50 years.

Meanwhile in other parts of the world, you'll often see countries investing in the construction of structures like the Sheikh Zayed Mosque in Abu Dhabi, which is a massive and beautiful marble and stone structure, which was built between 1996 and 2007.

Vufur
36
3 days ago

Not sure about Cathedral building skills but some working field have just been lost over time. We fucked up some restauration work in Greece because the way we build things is different now. Cathedral are way more complex, and I'm not sure that there is as much stone workers that they use to be ? Well I'm sure we could relearn all these skills but it would take some time.

largePenisLover
76
3 days ago

It's not a lost art or skill, nor is it an industry of the past.
The cathedral of Barcelona is still being built for example, it's not finished.
The restoration work in greece is fucked up because rockstar archeologists (wich is how archeology wored in the 1800's and early 1900's) imagineered how a civilization should have looked according to their vision and then "rebuild" that on top of existing ruins. In those days the one funding them was often the land and ruin owner. The nations didn't care yet, so they had unregulated freedom.
See Knosos for some prime examples of restorations that look nothing like how it would have looked.

Liqmadique
28
3 days ago

It's mostly a time and consequently money problem... see Barcelona's Sagrada Familia.

satanicwaffles
14
3 days ago

To be fair, some of the stuff Gaudi drew up for the Sagarada Familia simply wasn't possible to make in his life time.

They're using 60 MPa concrete (8.5 KSI) for the tops of the "trees" when older concrete mix designs from the mid 1900s might be 25% of that.

That building is a beautiful mix of old stonemason workmanship and modern civil engineering know-how.

catholicwannabe2
18
3 days ago

Yep, and I think we're about to see one of the largest fundraising goals in history fully met in a matter of weeks. They'll rebuild Notre Dame and they'll do it right.

uncletravellingmatt
62
3 days ago

It's only a matter of cost.

The Catholic church certainly has enough money to rebuild a cathedral. Not only does the Vatican have an estimated $10-$15 Billion on hand, they also could use ND reconstruction as the basis of a fund drive and likely come out ahead financially after raising funds for something people broadly support.

jib60
46
3 days ago

Pretty sure it belongs to the French state. I don't think the vatican would be willing to fund that.

RumbleSuperswami
50
3 days ago

It does — the NYTimes article mentioned that the French state owns it and pays a couple million euro a year in upkeep, and the Vatican is responsible for the day-to-day (salaries, cleaning, etc)

Edit to add: given the “dual status” of the cathedral as a major religious structure and a major cultural/historical icon for the people of France, raising money for reconstruction may be relatively easier. A French billionaire has already pledged 100 million euro towards the work

uncletravellingmatt
13
3 days ago

Wikipedia says "As the cathedral of the Archdiocese of Paris, Notre-Dame contains the cathedra of the Archbishop of Paris (Michel Aupetit)" so it seemed like it's a part of the Catholic church.

Actually, it says it was damaged during the French revolution, but "In July 1801, the new ruler, Napoleon Bonaparte, signed an agreement to restore the cathedral to the Church. It was formally transferred on 18 April 1802." -- https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Notre-Dame_de_Paris

But, even if the cathedral is church property, the French President just vowed to rebuild it, and didn't mention the Catholic church owning or maintaining their own cathedral:

https://www.apnews.com/91d9711a9e5549109dd04d264e02b720

20940
56
3 days ago

The Sagrada Familia in Barcelona is being built with traditional stonemasons and it’s taking decades and decades to finish.

somedude456
38
3 days ago

That church has multiple other issues like there's no blueprints, so design work was happening as it was being built.

I visited it a few years back and they said with recent advancements in stone cutting technology, they figure it would be done by 2030ish.

20940
18
3 days ago

Amazing to see the work actually occurring in slow motion and real time. I remember seeing someone working full time on a single gargoyle, just as would have been the case in Vienna or Paris a thousand years ago.

Jhonopolis
20
3 days ago

You wouldn't download a Cathedral.

corn_starch_party
15
3 days ago

What if they sued stl files? CAN WE CONVERT??

ctishman
12
3 days ago

Wololo

turbbit
27
3 days ago

La sagrada familia? It's possible, just stupid expensive.

OMGSPACERUSSIA
12
3 days ago

A good chunk of Europe's famous landmarks were destroyed or heavily damaged in WWII.

Hell, the Nazis made a concerted effort to destroy cathedrals, palaces and other culturally significant structures all across Eastern Europe. Most such buildings you see in Poland, Ukraine, Russia, etc., are Soviet-era reconstructions. They're very faithfully done, but not the 'original' in the strictest sense.

pipsdontsqueak
10595
3 days ago

That's a massive relief. However it's going to take years to repair the cathedral from the fire damage, let alone the smoke. Thankfully, Notre Dame is probably one of the most thoroughly studied pieces of architecture on the planet and the engineers will have a lot of data to work from to restore it.

mstrkingdom
9948
3 days ago

A couple of years ago a historian laser-scanned the entire building to try and document the construction history. There should be 3D models with ~5mm resolution.

VaiFate
4682
3 days ago

That’s both incredible from a technological standpoint and indispensable for restoring it after this tragedy

ladylondonderry
2508
3 days ago

I'm so grateful we live in an age where this is possible...if this fire happened only ten years ago, we wouldn't have that level of data.

MattvLee
1008
3 days ago

I know. The world changes so quickly now...

becauseiliketoupvote
6262
3 days ago

I know. It's breathtaking how quickly things change. Like did you know that as recently as this morning Notre Dame cathedral had a roof?

horrifiedlawngnome
1223
3 days ago

This is despicable and I love you for it.

Cowbili
56
3 days ago

The roof!

The roof!

The roof is on fire!

quiltsohard
25
3 days ago

Too soon

d3rtus
16
3 days ago

I know. The world changes so quickly now...

InterPunct
12
3 days ago

We don't need no water

yoda133113
14
3 days ago

Wait, the next line doesn't work. The Mother doesn't fuck, and we don't want it to burn anyway!

AppleSlacks
37
3 days ago

Yeah, maybe the new repair work can add some subway tile, with an all white organ. Definitely stainless steel candelabras.

Edit: And lots of shiplap!

Scientolojesus
29
3 days ago

Really has an al fresco feel to it.

boredlawyer90
13
3 days ago
pyronius
13
3 days ago

Did you know that as of this morning, the Sagrada Familia still isn't done?

Not all things change. Some do, but not all...

pigfacesoup
184
3 days ago

Maybe they can just 3D print a replica

SCREAMING_NEIGHBOUR
359
3 days ago

You wouldn't steal a cathedral

dwells1986
17
3 days ago

But on meth you would.

Shill_Borten
17
3 days ago

You bet your arse I would. I never got those stupid ads, they never made sense. Of course I would steal a car if I could just download it anonymously and it would work fine.

rlauren88
81
3 days ago

Yeah that would be a cool team of people for an AMA

malazer785
124
3 days ago

www.virtualwonders.com

They've got some really awesome people doing some really cool things.

SeverusVape0
476
3 days ago

You joke, but those guys are crazy invested in making the most historically accurate models.

Quxudia
276
3 days ago

I've felt for awhile that there is a massive disconnect between the teams designing the world of the AC games, and the people designing the gameplay of the AC games. The former are insanely dedicated to doing incredible work, the latter seem fine effectively copy pasting the same tired combat and game systems over and over again.

clearedmycookies
110
3 days ago

Wasn't that one of the big hooks for the game though? It's a Ubisoft game so some grinding of going up towers and such is to be expected, but the world and time era they build each game in, if done well can be so immersive, I'll pay 60 bucks to walk around an accurate recreation of history virtually

neubourn
53
3 days ago

Exactly. I love the AC franchise, but definitely not for its gameplay or story. Its just fun to go explore and be a part of some of the greatest locations, people and time periods in history: Greece during the Peloponnesian Wars, Ptolemaic Egypt, Levant during the Crusades, Italian Renaissance, Pirates in the Caribbean, Revolutionary America, Revolutionary Paris, Industrial Revolution London. What other game lets you witness all of that?

tundrat
15
3 days ago

Yeah. Some people say that we have too much AC games. But I see it that you have a big variety of time and places that you can visit to play in.

It was cool that I visited uh... some area, can't remember the name now... the same place twice both in real life and then in the game months later.

QuasarSandwich
14
3 days ago

I fell in love with Florence when I first visited (who doesn't?); then without really knowing much about it I bought either AC 1 or 2 and basically came in my pants when I saw the recreation of the city and how I could leap around it joyously. Outstanding.

sggsg1
13
3 days ago

I mean they did completely revamp the series for the last two games. Combat is much better, they have rpg like character progression, multiple ways of completing objectives. Lots of changes. They basically redesigned the games from the ground up.

oodelay
93
3 days ago

It's because of all those piles of hay people leave untended close to tall buildings.

RoostasTowel
101
3 days ago

And who left these piles of hay all around the cathedral?

s_at_work
88
3 days ago

Well that explains the fire..

usetheforce_gaming
84
3 days ago

You joke, but a lot of work went into making sure it was an accurate depiction.

It took devs over 2 years

kioni
22
3 days ago

the destructoid article is a more accurate depiction that actually talks about the artistic liberties they took purely for gameplay purposes. it took two years because they carefully compromised the accuracy.

InadequateUsername
78
3 days ago
just_plain_sam
18
3 days ago

I would think he would be elated and joyous that his effort was rewarded just in time. Awesome timing.

lacywing
38
3 days ago

That is excellent news but the Natl Geographic page is hot unreadable garbage. What is the name of the historian/project so we can find a better link?

link0007
396
3 days ago

If they get the ND to float, I'll be pretty impressed!

shan6
92
3 days ago

We're going to need a lot of ping pong balls.

felixfelix
74
3 days ago

It's mostly hollow already; it just needs a good dose of Flex-Seal.

Scientific_Anarchist
37
3 days ago

It just took a lotta damage so Flex-Seal is the next logical step

ThePr1d3
88
3 days ago

As if it weren't already tbf

(thinking about Viollet-le-Duc Restauration of the spire specifically)

PaintByLetters
71
3 days ago

Another good example: my 1993 Toyota Pickup 22RE with 385,000 miles on it.

sableram
21
3 days ago

Almost all the stonework has survived, and the wood in the bell towers has been saved, so it's really only the roof,spire,windows, and any pews/altars that need replacing. The bulk of it is still there.

tunamelts2
311
3 days ago

Assassin’s Creed: Unity is now the most cultural significant video game in the history of the human race...

InfernoidsorDie
267
3 days ago

Someone has never heard of Battletoads

JuanJuan66
14
3 days ago

Time to call GameStop!

getthedudesdanny
100
3 days ago

It's been laser mapped before and it's perhaps the most studied architectural site on Earth. Assassin's Creed has nothing to offer.

Scyhaz
20
3 days ago

Assassin's Creed has nothing to offer.

Except for where to put hand holds for parkour and strategic piles of hay.

Quetzie
63
3 days ago

I think it might be much more likely that they will use the laserscans of the building of a scientist (Tallon) who documented it a couple of years ago.

OSCgal
602
3 days ago

I would say that the fire will become part of the building's story.

There are a lot of churches and cathedrals that have burned or been gutted by war. When I visited Germany some years back, we saw many. The two I remember most were the Cathedral of Magdeburg and the Dresden Frauenkirche.

The Frauenkirche was almost completely destroyed by firebombing in WWII. Because of the type of stone it's made of, you can see clearly what's new and what's old. The new stuff is now part of its story. For instance, the golden cross at the top of the dome was a gift from the United Kingdom, the nation that destroyed the old one.

By_your_command
195
3 days ago

I would say that the fire will become part of the building's story.

Indeed.

”When the Great Library burned, the first ten thousand years of stories were reduced to ash. But, those stories never really perished. They became a new story. The story of the fire itself. For man's urge to take a thing of beauty and strike the match”.

  • Dr. Robert Ford, Westworld
Blarg_III
29
3 days ago

Just going to pedantically point out that most of the important texts had been moved elsewhere by the time of the fire, and very little of any importance was lost.

alexbholder
12
3 days ago

Reminds me of Windsor Castle. Another historical building that was devastated by fire. The major loss was to the fabric of the castle. The false ceiling in St George's Hall and the void for coal trucks beneath the floor had allowed the fire to spread. It burned as far as the Chester Tower. Several ceilings collapsed. Apartments burnt included the Crimson Drawing Room (completely gutted), the Green Drawing Room (badly damaged, though only partially destroyed by smoke and water) and the Queen's Private Chapel. The extent of the damage was 36.5 million pounds.

MyNameIsGriffon
601
3 days ago

Honestly, she's suffered worse. It will always feel "wrong" to us when parts of it are rebuilt, but in two hundred years people will see it as part of the history, like we see the construction that took place after the desecration in the Revolution.

OMGSPACERUSSIA
463
3 days ago

In the aftermath of WWII, one of the immediate priorities of the Soviet authorities was to rebuild the palaces and cathedrals the Germans had demolished during the war, on the basis that "if we don't do this now, by the time we get around to it the people who know what they look like will be dead."

Haltopen
132
3 days ago

Which is funny considering they blew up the Cathedral of Christ the Savior in moscow so they could use the land for a palace of the soviets that was never built thanks to world war two. The empty foundation was then converted in the fifties into the worlds largest swimming pool before being demolished so the new russian federation could rebuild the church

OMGSPACERUSSIA
83
3 days ago

Not really, if you consider the evolution of Soviet policy which took place during WWII.

Prior to the war, there was a heavy emphasis on the idea of a unified 'Soviet' culture. Much like the early days of revolutionary France, there was a certain zeal for removing reminders of the previous regime, especially in the major urban centers. Notre Dame itself was quite heavily damaged by mobs in the aftermath of the monarchy's downfall.

During WWII, though, there was a major shift in Soviet doctrine. They wound up, somewhat ironically, appealing to senses of national and religious identity. They even allowed religious attaches in the army. That nationalistic bent remained afterward, and certain historical figures from the Tsarist era were redeemed (EG: Peter the Great who was 'rehabilitated' as a modernizing, positive influence.)

ownedbydogs
90
3 days ago

Has she? I don’t think any event in the last 900-odd years has come close to exacting this much damage, at this scale, in one blow.

Before the massive 19th century restoration effort whatever slights Notre Dame had weathered was accumulated over centuries. Even the sans-culottes and Jacobin mobs of the 1793 Revolution limited themselves to hacking up anything remotely royalist and overly religious- which unfortunately included several wooden statues of the Biblical kings of Israel depicted in medieval crowns and garb, and mistaken for effigies of the Capetians. Notre Dame’s sheer size limited the damage and her conversion into a storehouse and Temple of Reason spared her further desecration. Even Hitler’s deputy in the last days of WW2 refused the order to burn her along with all of Paris.

The stone shell of her still stands, but the original handcarved woodwork (boiserie?) inside was the real loss.

MyNameIsGriffon
78
3 days ago

In one stroke, no. And it's true that there's a lot that will never be recovered; one of the rose windows was destroyed, the other two are badly damaged, the woodwork is gone, yes it's a disaster. But the only things that we think were lost are things that we know how to rebuild. It'll never be the same, but that's history.

frenetic_geek
16
3 days ago

Looked pretty hot to me end to end, don't see how two rose windows are recoverable, but we'll have to see. More worryingly I saw the partial collapse of the vaulted cieling in some photos.

I didn't actually realise the timber roof structures were so ancient. I did visit the site in 2013 and for some reason always thought the 19th-century restoration was more extensive. Apart from the spire it really only dealt with finishes, ornamentation and decoration. The core structures remained medieval.

MyNameIsGriffon
19
3 days ago

The ceiling that came down was the one added in the 1800s, to my knowledge the underlying stone was still completely intact. If that had gone I don't think anything would be standing.

frenetic_geek
11
3 days ago

It was this pic I was looking at:

link

You can see partial collapse of the vaulting.

mck1117
15
3 days ago

It looks like the one section that was punched out was the one that the spire fell on. There's a corresponding pile of smoldering spire on the floor under it. Even the candles on the ground floor didn't melt, so it didn't get very hot in there.

SupaSlide
30
3 days ago

What worse thing has happened to this Cathedral?

MyNameIsGriffon
61
3 days ago

Nothing in one fell swoop. Although as I'm learning more about today it does seem that it was worse than I first thought. I didn't realize the full extent of the damage. It will be rebuilt though, the things we can't rebuild all survived. It won't be the same but it wasn't the same after the restorations in the 1800s either.

MIguy68
38
3 days ago

The entire inside was wood, most of it dating back to the early 13th century. All of those sculptures and carvings are gone and can't be replaced, only reproduced.

JustifiedTrueBelief
14
3 days ago

You're missing the point. You just do it again, and in 800 years it'll be the same.

MIguy68
14
3 days ago

No, it'll be 800 year old history rather than 1600 year old history. That's not close to the same.

Bede_the_Venerable
21
3 days ago
SpiderSchwein
13
3 days ago

I’ve thought about exactly that today. Like if you could somehow 3D print all of the interior pieces such that there was no discernible difference between the two, would people care?

I’d certainly hope so. There should be a massive difference between a creation and a reproduction. You just have to consider the craftsmanship of one master taking years and decades on a piece of art. Walter Benjamin theorized that a piece of art contains the aura of its creator and the artist was saying something through the creation. A mechanical reproduction of that piece of art loses this intrinsic value.

KNIT_FOR_KNAT
15
3 days ago

Cathedrals take decades or centuries to build and have more than one creator.

Now it will just have more creators.

MetalRetsam
13
3 days ago

That's a nice Platonic way of looking at it, but unfortunately things decay here in the real world. Notre Dame was restored in the past to keep it from crumbling further, it was being restored recently, and it will be restored in the future. The cathedral stays, no matter its contents. In the 19th century, architects often went to town on restoring old Gothic monuments. So today we're faced with a choice: do we leave the embellishments the way they are (after all, they're genuine 19th century antiques) or do we remove them again? The same question will be true for Notre Dame: do we restore in 13th century style, 19th century style, or add in something new to reflect the history? We have the means to do any of the three -- check out that 13th century castle being built in France at the moment. Would you rather preserve the memory for as long as possible, or or leave the gaping hole?

People will come to Notre Dame. Within 30 years, a new generation of tourists will have no recollection of the fire (or care to read about it), or tha many pages of history that came before it. The artwork may be reconstructed, and people will gawk at it all the same -- because the idea is preserved. Architecture is a craft just like any other. Thankfully we've gotten better at crafting in recent times.

At least, that's my take on it. I'd love to see some rebuilt buildings in the Forum Romanum, cause right now it's just bits of marble lying in the grass. Patch up the old Coliseum and use it as a stadium once again. What's the point of admiring craftsmanship if it's not in use?

That said, different types of art have different functions. If you want to study text, access the original, of course. But most of us aren't academics.

Darsol
53
3 days ago

Technically, what we've consider the "vibe" for a hundred or so years was "just pretty good for a recreation" at one point.

Little_hat_logan
43
3 days ago

It's worth bearing in mind that a lot of historical buildings have been burned down and rebuild over time, not to mention all the restoration work. With competant architects and sufficient investment I'm sure it'll turn out well.

FunkyChug
30
3 days ago

What other choice do they have? The church is already burned. You can rebuild it and try to preserve what’s left, or do nothing. No matter what happens next, it’s just going to be a recreation.

practically_floored
60
3 days ago

No matter what happens next, it’s just going to be a recreation.

This is a strange way of thinking about it - most iconic buildings in Europe are 'recreations' - in part or completely - because fire, earthquakes, war etc had got to them before. It's just that some of those recreations are 400+ years old now, and one day the restorations after this fire will be too.

TheShiff
25
3 days ago

Isn't it still a functioning Cathedral? Like, you can attend Mass there under normal circumstances?

JoeFarma
27
3 days ago

Yes.

TheShiff
21
3 days ago

IIRC they were actually working on renovating the part that caught fire. You can see construction scaffolding amid the flames.

Djikass
15
3 days ago

The roof went on fire and yes it was part of the renovation due to water leaking etc. It’s been decades the cathedral was in need of it (amongst many other things) but few was done over the years.

banditta82
12
3 days ago

Based on the temples and shrines that were rebuilt in Japan after WWII I would say yes.

explosivechryssalid
6861
3 days ago

Have there been any reports of the Rose Windows?

Spezpong
5492
3 days ago

Apparently 1 is destroyed and 2 are badly damaged

OlivierDeCarglass
4203
3 days ago

And to think they were about to be 800 years old...

Stlr_Mn
2414
3 days ago

1 was entirely new glass, 1 mostly new glass and the last one was mostly old glass. I cannot recall which. I am not referring to the one user who accidentally was talking about the Reims cathedral.

JoeyTheGreek
1009
3 days ago

The lead is the issue, it’ll melt and release the pieces well before the glass is irrevocably damaged.

Why_is_this_so
388
3 days ago

If the lead melts, aren't the pieces then falling to the ground, and presumably breaking?

JoeyTheGreek
305
3 days ago

Yes, I’m just saying that the fire isn’t breaking the glass, so if it doesn’t break in the fall it may be okay. Then again cold water hitting the glass is equally bad. Probably too pedantic for my own good.

jmlay420
141
3 days ago

Objection your honor, irrelevant

really-drunk-too
35
3 days ago

I'm not meaning to be pedantic, your honor, but I objected based on my objections.

jmlay420
24
3 days ago

Objection overruled, continue

jmlay420
13
3 days ago

Are you drunk in my courtroom?

CowboyState
18
3 days ago

I'm an engineer, but that isn't required to confirm it will break in the fall.

eckswhy
64
3 days ago

This is not related but you all may find it interesting.

I worked for a construction company that remodeled a Catholic Church on a navy base whose name will not be specified that was built in 1942.

The stained glass windows had the same lead frame as these windows had, and due to both the historical aspect, and the environmental concerns; what ended up happening was pretty cool. The navy commissioned catholic nuns from Italy who were specifically trained to repair the windows, and brought them from Italy to the base, where they removed the entire window as one piece, and rebuilt it with an aluminum frame, reclaiming the lead, and preserving the glass. It is even today, the most personally evident example of government working for its constituents that I have ever seen; and is a daily reminder of why we all need to be more politically active. We can do the right things, if we elect competent leaders.

DerekB52
29
3 days ago

if we elect competent leaders.

World record for largest "if" ever.

ebaggabe
145
3 days ago

This is talking about Notre Dame at Rheims not The Notre Dame at Paris.

LivedOnce
14
3 days ago

Thank you. I was reconsidering my history knowledge and imagining Germans besieging Paris in 1916 like Stalingrad in 1942.

LordKwik
181
3 days ago

Glaziers do amazing work. They restore glass in buildings like this all the time, all around the world. Even if they weren't blown out in WW1, they'd have to be repaired periodically, since, as I understand it, glass is not a solid and it shifts.

Although glaziers usually fix small portions/chips/cracks and not the entire works, they still have the expertise and knowledge to do so. With all the data they must have on this cathedral, it shouldn't be too difficult. It still really sucks, but the knowledge of the trade is not lost and we can still admire a fully restored piece, and all its history behind it.

Edit: crossed out what I was told, but glaziers do in fact fix pieces like this constantly

dumbass-ahedratron
48
3 days ago

Ignore these jabronis, you were somewhat right and somewhat wrong as glass is an Amorphous Solid

TitaniumDragon
25
3 days ago

Amorphous solids are solids.

The reason why old glass was thicker at the bottom than the top isn't because it is an amorous solid, it's because of old glassmaking techniques.

AsterJ
17
3 days ago

To be clear the old techniques were incapable of making flat glass so the glass was installed with the thick side down for stability.

ittybittywhale
632
3 days ago

There's pictures of the windows, the glass has been blown out :(

explosivechryssalid
235
3 days ago

Do you happen to have a link to them? :(

SkorpioSound
47
3 days ago

Incredibly tragic though it is, I find some of those pictures really beautiful.

Frodude32
27
3 days ago

Yeah those first few night ones are tragically beautiful

waifive
39
3 days ago

That's not the correct window. The rose window would be one level below this one.

Estelindis
165
3 days ago

I've seen flames gouting out through several windows, but I've also seen images of other windows that have survived. Reportedly the north rose window is still up. But of course reports are coming in from various sources that aren't completely sync'd with each other.

phoebsmon
105
3 days ago

They just said on BBC (was a chap from Iowa University I think? Didn't catch his name I'm afraid) that the firefighters had deliberately tried to cool the area to stop the lead melting enough to give way. Which windows they were trying to save and how well they did is a mystery but at least it's a little hope. The inside looks better than I expected too. Was expecting Coventry Cathedral type images but it's not quite that far gone.

Hachiman594
13
3 days ago

One of the other interesting things to note in the early interior photographs is where you can see candles. If the candles aren't distorted, the local temperature was definitely well below 200°F/93°C.

LeFricadelle
593
3 days ago

didn't survive, but we can make them again

the most important thing is what the news is telling and that most of the relic have been saved

alpha69
980
3 days ago

Dunno, relics are always of questionable origin, and those rose windows were unquestionably masterpieces.

LeFricadelle
574
3 days ago

it's true, but most of these rose windows were already remade one century before, we're gonna made them again

[deleted]
95
3 days ago

[deleted]

LeFricadelle
145
3 days ago

sadly i don't, but a lot of rework have been done throughout centuries, specially for these windows

most of these glass weren't from the 12th century anymore

[deleted]
47
3 days ago

[deleted]

cruznick06
41
3 days ago

I worked in stained glass for 14 months and can say it really depends on how they were redone. I'll have to call up my old boss about it, he probably has more information. There is actually a good amount of knowledge on how to make the glass like it was originally and certain types/colors of glass are still made almost the same way. With the amount of documentation of the windows we have along with the literally thousands of photos of them I know it is possible to rebuild them. It will be expensive and time consuming as hell but it can be done! To be honest I don't think it would be the glass that is the hardest part to replace, it could be the lead/zinc came instead. Just restoring windows from the 1940's could be a huge pain as certain widths/styles of came were literally not made anymore. Considering this is an internationally renowned cathedral I bet they could get the needed materials produced.

RabidMortal
12
3 days ago

but most of these rose windows were already remade one century before

Not true. In fact Notre Dame is (was) one of the few European cathedrals to have most of its original glass.

puffic
503
3 days ago

A relic's value lies in its (alleged) origin. You can't just make a replacement relic. A historic structure, on the other hand, can still be a cultural landmark once it is rebuilt.

Edit: Since it wasn’t obvious enough, we’re putting ourselves in the shoes of a Catholic who truly believes in the relic’s supposed origins. If you aren’t imagining that the relics are real, you’re missing the point.

Aleblanco1987
151
3 days ago

A historic structure, on the other hand, can still be a cultural landmark once it is rebuilt.

more like while its being built

Like the sagrada familia, more than 130 years under construction and that doesn't stop it from being one of Barcelona's top attractions.

Krabban
15
3 days ago

Most important if you're religious.

Personally while the relics are priceless historical artifacts, I don't really care for them as much as I do for the cathedral itself and it's architecture/features

LeFricadelle
21
3 days ago

i'm not religious at all but i care, they are part of french history

TunerOfTuna
2068
3 days ago

Thank goodness they didn’t dump a tank of water on it.

wreckingballheart
3122
3 days ago

For anyone curious about why this wouldn't actually work aerial drops are rarely used in structural firefighting for a few reasons. Water is very heavy and aerial drops aren't always that precise. It puts the firefighters at a huge risk of getting hit by falling water. They typically have to pause on the ground operations and back off to ensure their safety. In the same water is very heavy vein, falling water can cause a massive amount of damage to a building, more damage than even the fire would. It can also send burning debris flying for blocks, increasing the risk of other buildings nearby catching fire.

Rubberbabybuggybum
3264
3 days ago

Congratulations. You’re smarter than the Goddamned President of the United States.

DictaSupreme
1097
3 days ago

Also smarter than the_donald who think trump literally invented the idea of aerial firefighting

Fluffy_Rock
843
3 days ago

They...I...What? You cannot be serious, they cant be that stupid right?

I must venture forth and check...

Edit: I have returned from the valley of death scum! I didn't see anyone saying exactly that, but I did see a few people talking about how French pilots just weren't skilled enough to perform a drop and that 'retardent would have easily saved the building'. sigh

I also saw something much more concerning though, which is that the entire sub seems to have rallied behind the idea that this was a terrorist attack conducted by Muslim migrants 1. As an attack on Christianity and 2. SO THAT THEY CAN PUT A MOSQUE THERE.

Unbelievable.

netolokao
417
3 days ago

Holy shit, you weren't kidding.

They know more about controlling the fire and preserving the structure than the firefighters, and more about what caused the incident than the autorities investigating.

It makes me sad to see how many people like that there are on reddit/the world, such an terrible hivemind.

SharkBaitDLS
161
3 days ago

I think they don’t realize water has mass.

Fluffy_Rock
38
3 days ago

Probably something along the lines of "its a church so god will protect it from 2600lbs of water at terminal velocity right? right!?"

madsci
13
3 days ago

2600lbs of water

Add a zero or two. The tankers they fly around here carry 100,000 pounds of water and can drop it in 8 seconds.

tubarao312
23
3 days ago

That's ridiculous if they threw water on the cathedral it would just start floating upward have you never been to the pool

mikeoley
84
3 days ago

Some of the dumbest ideas I’ve seen in my life have come out of that sub. It’s a cesspool of idiocy.

LOHare
40
3 days ago

Are Muslims the new Jews? Cathedral catches fire, blame the Muslims!

sulaymanf
37
3 days ago

Yes, and that’s been the case for many years now, sadly. Everything from the Columbia space shuttle crash to the missing MH60 plane has been blamed on Muslims. Oklahoma City bombing was blamed on Muslims and mosques burned down before Timothy McVeigh was caught. Even Trump blamed the Philippines casino fire on Muslims until it turned out the fire was accidental.

Wazula42
146
3 days ago
  1. SO THAT THEY CAN PUT A MOSQUE THERE.

Because, you know, they can just wheel one in like a hot dog cart. And we have to let them because reasons.

grumpy_hedgehog
29
3 days ago

Maybe they think life works like C&C? Like you build a mosque and then just plop it once the area is cleared?

Airway
31
3 days ago

They think you either lick Trump's boots or you want brown people to fuck your wife.

Sorry to be so blunt about it but that's exactly how those terrorist psychopaths see the world.

ClayGCollins9
36
3 days ago

These people are the ones that would crucify 21st century Jesus for being a socialist neo-lib

digital_end
34
3 days ago

A third of America is that bad at this point. The joy of captured news sources and radicalization.

Fluffy_Rock
18
3 days ago

It was distressing, to put it lightly. Edited my response to include what I saw!

DictaSupreme
25
3 days ago

I love that they think it was burned by Muslims to put a mosque there as if the Catholic Church is going to sell the land which is prime real estate in the center of Paris that they have owned for a literal thousand years.

Jiriakel
12
3 days ago

Just FYI, the Church doesn't own Notre Dame - most old French churches are not, in fact. Notre Dame is owned by the French Government, although it is leased by the Archbishop of Paris.

raikumori
20
3 days ago

Just had a coworker say that she “doubted very much” that it was a “total accident” citing “church vandalism that has been happening a lot recently”.

Pretty sure vandalism and burning down the Notre Dame cathedral are a little bit different.

Sometimes... I’m really ashamed to be an American.

spoonsforeggs
77
3 days ago

Jesus christ they go instant to conspiracy mode.

'it was before Easter seems suspicious'

Shit fucking happens you insane bunch of idiots.

Zeig9
24
3 days ago

It's always before Easter. Checkmate libruls!

Rubberbabybuggybum
12
3 days ago

THEY'RE. A. CULT.

And any cult is base on the following: The leader is never wrong.

That's why they'll accept any fucking dumbass idea he presents.

Because they have to. The only option is to ADMIT THEY WERE DUPED BY A CON MAN.

And they're too weak to admit that.

fungusnotamongus
23
3 days ago

All you need to do is believe one of:

  • vaccines don't cause autism

*. the earth is round

  • climate change is real and happening

and BAM, you're smarter than the dummy in the white house.

Rubberbabybuggybum
93
3 days ago

Don’t insult Forest Gump by comparing him to Trump.

Forest Gump honorably served.

Forest Gump was a successful, self made businessman with zero bankruptcies.

Forest Gump never sexually assaulted women without their consent.

Forest Gump was faithful to his wife and son.

Forest Gump never paid of pornstar mistresses.

Forest Gump is a better man than Trump will ever be.

Duke_UK
22
3 days ago

Gump 2020

notmyrealnam3
14
3 days ago

this is my assumed stance with everyone until they prove otherwise to me

cornflakegrl
14
3 days ago

Honestly I can’t even talk about how angry I was when I got off work and was searching for updates about what was happening with the fire and I was bombarded by this dumb story about the idiotic thing Trump said about it.

tjsr
50
3 days ago

Slightly unrelated story, but growing up I worked in motor racing. At an event at Phillip Island, a driver (Skaife, maybe?) had crap on his windscreen, so some genius on his pit crew thought "we'll just clean it off with a bucket of water when he comes past".

At over 270km/h.

That's 5kg of water. Hitting a windshield.

I saw this being prepped, but before I could reach for my radio to tell someone to stop him it was too late. Predictably, the windscreen collapsed from being hit with, effectively, a 5kg object at 250+km/h.

Now imagine dropping a few tons of water on a burning, possibly structurally damaged building. You probably don't want to do that.

klaysDoodle
32
3 days ago

Seriously as soon as I saw the tweet I thought it was insane.

Water bombers can drop 17 tons of water in one go at max. That's fine for trees and somewhere you just can't access but would destroy anything you drop it on. Here is one putting out a highway fire in a remote location.

You can see it visibly moves a semi truck and grader.

You would never want to drop that on a building like Notre Dame, especially once it's already on fire.

wreckingballheart
19
3 days ago

He's absolutely batshit and him tweeting things like this just create work that the French government has to officially debunk.

Trees generally tolerate water drops pretty well, because they are mostly parallel to the water and bendy (although they certainly lose limbs/branches/leaves). Buildings/cars/etc don't tolerate them nearly as well. Water drops, even from helicopters, would have destroyed Notre Dame.

SMALLWANG69
21
3 days ago

Honest question. What about that bright red powder they dump on wild fires?

istartedi
65
3 days ago

Phos-Chek. They dump it on stuff near the fire. It keeps new fire from starting. It's not used to put out existing fires.

StuTheSheep
14
3 days ago

I suspect that stuff is not great for your lungs if you breathe it in. Probably not a good idea to release it in a heavily populated area.

pixel_of_moral_decay
15
3 days ago

Seriously... dumping water would be like dumping a ton of sand. It would have collapsed the vault for certain, which would have destabilized the entire thing. Now the vault was punctured in a few places but otherwise things might actually be structurally sound.

PriorInsect
15
3 days ago

In the same water is very heavy vein, falling water can cause a massive amount of damage to a building, more damage than even the fire would

wet water can't melt steel beams! /s

Tenkehat
487
3 days ago

The fire department respons to that was a remarkably calm example of saying f*** off.

pipsdontsqueak
573
3 days ago

Experts said that the president's proposal would likely make the situation more dangerous.

"If you hit that with tons of water from above, that's going to collapse the entire structure and make the situation worse," said Wayne McPartland, a retired New York City Fire Department battalion chief. "If you miss, you might hit civilians in the street."

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/04/15/trump-encourages-france-to-use-flying-water-tankers-for-notre-dame-fire.html

kotkaiser
474
3 days ago

Why can't he just...be right about literally anything? Just for once. Coincidentally.

driverofracecars
336
3 days ago

Because he doesn't know anything about the stuff he talks about and he doesn't know when is best to speak your mind and when is best to keep to yourself.

Simply put, his narcissism leads him to believe he's an expert on anything and everything and he believes his input is always wanted because, after all, if you're always right in your mind, then surely other people need your input, right?

jah-makin-me-happy
104
3 days ago

I’m so excited for the time when we have someone who doesn’t have the nastiest traits available in human beings in the highest office in the nation. Soon 🤞🏽

writenroll
21
3 days ago

Every time he gives 'advice' I hear it the voice of Guy from Galaxy Quest: "I know! You construct a weapon. Look around, can you form some sort of rudimentary lathe?"

VerticalYea
130
3 days ago

Water. And moving quickly. Damnit, why didn't we think of that? We were just throwing leaves at it and taking naps.

IdeaPowered
36
3 days ago

We were just throwing leaves at it and taking naps.

For some reason I imagined they were all puppies, dressed like firefighters, with tiny leaves in their little mouths while others dozed off a little bit off.

biinjo
13
3 days ago

It would indeed have been really weird to see them dump the entire flying tank of water on it instead of just releasing the water while flying over the fire.

(/jk)

viva_la_vinyl
49
3 days ago

I mean what the hell does he know?

TunerOfTuna
79
3 days ago

That he can say whatever he wants and his base will defend him to the death to say he’s right.

InfinityMitten
65
3 days ago

his base will defend him to the death to say he’s right.

The current talking points are:

  • Paris firefighters purposely didn't do anything for the first few hours

  • Water can't hurt buildings

  • Trump knows more about buildings than anyone else because he's personally built several

Krabban
1121
3 days ago

Half of the Reims cathedral was reduced to a pile of rubble and the rest a broken shell during WW1 and it took ~20 years to reconstruct it enough to open.

Edit: The damage to the Notre Dame (Paris) isn't nearly as extensive, the brick vaulted nave seems to have survived with only slight damage here and there and the most significant being the collapse of transept crossing, which was caused by the spire crashing through the roof.

The walls and flying buttresses are still holding. The timber frame roof is basically all gone but managed to only burn out on-top of the vaulted ceiling, sadly the framing was from the 12th century.

Some additional serious damage seems the organ, the altar and the rose windows; one totally destroyed and two damaged, also sadly centuries old. Some of the less noticeable damage but still significant are probably going to be all the glass windows, the fresco paintings and various wooden detailing on the interior, as well as general smoke, soot and water damage.

There was risk of the wooden supports in the bell tower burning through causing the bells, potentially the whole tower, to collapse but seems to be under control.

All in all it's looking reasonably good so far, could've been a lot, lot worse.

Jabbam
513
3 days ago

It took 100 years to build it almost a millennium ago. By hand. I think we can do this in 20 years.

Spezpong
385
3 days ago

Especially considering it's fame and cultural importance, experts from all over the world will offer help

snubdeity
237
3 days ago

And most importantly, the deep pockets of the Vatican will want it restored quickly

centralintelligency
192
3 days ago

Nope. They’ve been renovating it and the Vatican wanted nothing to do with helping.

Beer_Gut_Bob
56
3 days ago

That was just regular renovations. This is a big disaster televised all over the world, and that has thousands of people in tears. If the Vatican calculates a chance that stepping in with funding will take some pressure off them for sex scandal-related things you can bet they'll be there with an open wallet.

IAMColonelFlaggAMA
29
3 days ago

Between France, the City of Paris, the Church, and people worldwide the money will be found.

CannedMango
20
3 days ago

This post has given me the most hope I've had today. Thank you.

yourkberley
103
3 days ago

I agree. Southampton is completely soulless. It's like one gigantic office park. The Titanic sailed from there and you wouldn't think so from looking at the city, there's no evidence of any history there whatsoever.

6beesknees
59
3 days ago

The city was flattened during WW2, though, and I'd guess there was just too much damage to repair the older buildings that had been destroyed.

There are little pockets of history there, if you know where to look.

The song "The Bells of St Mary" was based on St Mary's church. The Old Cemetery, up Hill Lane, has some truly wonderful memorials and there's a Tudor House in the city centre. They are, I believe, trying to do more with the walls.

tomtomtumnus
67
3 days ago

One of my favorite classes in college was Art History. Notre Dame was the last thing we studied. Between that and being raised Catholic, I am crushed right now....

Hippopoptimus_Prime
62
3 days ago

Fortunately we have a very detailed 3d scan of the entire building thanks to lasers.

InkDagger
27
3 days ago

I am with you. I've dreamed of seeing it ever since I was a child. I've written every essay in college that I could on her influence and history. I even fantasized about getting married there, even if I knew that would never happen.

Now I dont know if I'll ever see her.

IamRick_Deckard
1786
3 days ago

I study French history, and if I know the French, they will rebuild it with the absolute best architects and restorers in the world. They will contact experts in all areas to come up with the best solutions to every problem, and it will be amazing. The rebuilding they do will take into account the destruction in an emotionally sensitive and satisfying way.

biinjo
790
3 days ago

I’m looking forward to the field trip of my yet to be born child going to see the grand reopening of the legendary Notre Dame cathedral.

IamRick_Deckard
209
3 days ago

That's the spirit.

Parlorshark
13
3 days ago

Unfortunately it will have been relocated to northern Indiana.

Battkitty2398
406
3 days ago

So you're saying they should do it for the exposure?

Thrashy
538
3 days ago

I mean, as an architectural designer I'm generally opposed to handing out freebies, but having "Cathedrale de Notre Dame de Paris Reconstruction" in your CV or portfolio, either personally or as a firm, is basically an automatic "I win" button for any future architectural preservation or restoration job you go after.

KyokoGG
158
3 days ago

I guess it is a once in a lifetime opportunity.

PhAnToM444
142
3 days ago

... we can only hope

Sounders_Till_I_Die
12
3 days ago

Provided they don't decide to hire the cleaning lady to repaint Jesus' face on the frescoes.

Verpous
29
3 days ago

More like personal pleasure, sounds like.

[deleted]
14
3 days ago

For the Notre-riety

The_Oogie
148
3 days ago

A French billionaire said he'd donate €100,000,000 towards restoration.

trankzen
84
3 days ago

That's François-Henri Pinault AKA Salma Hayek's husband.

TakingDirtNaps
61
3 days ago

Salma Hayek’s husband? Dude’s winning at life

ONEMariachi
32
3 days ago

Billionaire and married to her. Jesus christ

TheSwegMagician
46
3 days ago

The guy who owns YSL, Gucci, etc. Worth $30b, owns Rennes FC, and is married to Salam Hayek. Now contributing to the Notre Dame rebuild. Safe to say he’s living life to it’s fullest

LeCrushinator
1414
3 days ago

EDIT: account below was suspended, I posted a mirror to the image later in this comment.

https://twitter.com/CathedraleNotre/status/1117920118686851072

It's actually in great condition, all things considered.

Mirror of image thumbnail. I can’t find the original, the twitter account is not mine so the original picture wasn’t taken by me.

Centauri2
534
3 days ago

Unbelievable. A close-up shot showed that the candles on the altar did not melt.

sciwa
682
3 days ago

so you're telling me almost everything in that building burned down, except for the very things designed to burn down?

CozmicClockwork
215
3 days ago

Most of the fire was on the roof and beneath that was stone vaulting. Of course some of it was damaged and allowed the flames to spread to the main chambers but enough stayed put to keep a lot of burning debris out of the cathedral. This is why you even see that some of the pews seem untouched in the pictures.

LadyHeather
12
3 days ago

So, help me understand... was there a space between the interior ceiling and the weatherproofing (roof) on the outside and is the outer shell what burned?

Netolu
17
3 days ago

The Vaulted Roof has a secondary wooden structure above it, as shown.

cecilkorik
124
3 days ago

Well that's the thing, the building didn't really burn down, the fire mostly burned up. It doesn't travel down very well. It looks like the fire was mostly contained to the upper structure, and firefighters were able to keep it there. I too am surprised at the relative lack of damage, but I think it makes sense.

superpotato20
64
3 days ago

God works in mysterious ways.

Stone_guard96
17
3 days ago

Yes, but a firehose is pretty damn predictable. They just got dunked in water

bankkopf
54
3 days ago

I think only the wooden roof burned much with how it is built.

But the are going to have some pretty nasty water damage with the amount they had to use to contain that fire.

SkyJohn
445
3 days ago

Looks like the spire collapse is what caused that hole in the vault.

I'm really surprised that the inside looks that good.

cfox0835
34
3 days ago

You could almost say it’s....

A Miracle.

yankee-white
100
3 days ago

You can almost say...

The wood beams caught fire and were destroyed, but the building was made out of stone and was difficult to destroy.

Source: three little pigs.

luke_in_the_sky
22
3 days ago

But can jet fuel melt wood beams?

Steaktartaar
21
3 days ago

One advantage of medieval engineering was that, without much of our modern design aids, their structures were massively over-built. "Make that wall a bit thicker, better safe than sorry" turns out to be a great recipe for long-lasting architecture.

Pun-pucking-tastic
19
3 days ago

That is not really the case with gothic architecture. Unlike earlier styles gothic churches have these long, slim, vertical columns rising up to the heavens, they have walls that are mostly made up of windows and are unlike the thick fortress-like walls of earlier times.

It was not unheard of for these cathedrals to collapse during the build. There was no way to calculate the loads, and architecture was more an art than a science.

The only reason we think that these guys knew what they did or that they put safety margins in all the right places is that all the buildings where they did not get it right are long gone and forgotten.

Classic survivorship bias.

Krandor1
42
3 days ago

I found bet once they can get in reinforcing that ceiling is going to be job 1.

bobthebonobo
909
3 days ago

Wow thank god. For a while there it looked like the whole thing might turn to ash

bananasplitsyourgirl
281
3 days ago

Why’s everything historic burning down

PhobosOrDeimos
582
3 days ago

Compared to the previous century, I think we're doing alright in the 2000s compared to 1900s so far on catastrophe.

jonttu125
332
3 days ago

We're overdue a world war by now.

SpicyJw
561
3 days ago

no no no no no no no no nooooooooooooo

ladylondonderry
120
3 days ago

JFC don't jinx us, mate!

roastmybean
12
3 days ago

don't jinx it, dude

Is_Not_A_Real_Doctor
227
3 days ago

Physics is a cruel mistress.

GandalffladnaG
22
3 days ago

And the outer stone was already falling off, old cathedrals and cars exhaust don't mix.

disneypingenie
785
3 days ago

"And some say the soul of the city's the toll of the bells, the bells of Notre Dame" :(

-OrangeLightning4
142
3 days ago

One of my favorite Disney songs and openings to a film.

scizormytimbers
118
3 days ago

The way he belts that last "BELLS OF NOTRE DAME!" never ceases to send shivers up and down my spine.

-OrangeLightning4
55
3 days ago

That entire last verse is money.

"Here is a riddle to guess if you can, sing the bells of Notre Dame. Who is the monster, and who is the man?"

Hachiman594
33
3 days ago

If the structure is sound enough, it would be more than appropriate for Notre Dame's bells to sound this coming Easter Sunday.

GearBrain
13
3 days ago

I... really hope this happens, now.

Spikekuji
332
3 days ago

Whoever put up this scaffolding is impressive. I can’t believe it is still holding.

nixielover
224
3 days ago

Yeah can we hire those guys for the rebuild?

pta2002
220
3 days ago

I mean they were kinda the ones at fault for the whole thing in the first place...

heavyLobster
44
3 days ago

Job security! Genius.

kmosdell
36
3 days ago

I thought it was Ryan's fault.

AlcoholicZach
24
3 days ago

Ryan started the fire 🎶

Kingful
15
3 days ago

Do we know that for sure? It's a huge coincidence yeah but this is how witch hunts get started.

junkyardgerard
16
3 days ago

No no, that was the renovators. We want the guys that built the scaffolding FOR the renovators ;)

Critical_Mason
295
3 days ago

One of them has been seriously injured.

Now to hoping he pulls through.

Dwarmin
50
3 days ago

They must have fought hard to save the building, even to the point of injury.

True French spirit on display.

sakumieu
18
3 days ago

He was in there to save as much relicts as possible until the ceiling colapsed. He barely made it out.
A true hero

Exotemporal
21
3 days ago

It was heartwarming to watch hundreds of Parisians applaud the firefighters as they drove by the crowds.

TooShiftyForYou
423
3 days ago

Great work by all the firefighters and personnel involved with saving the building. It looked to be in certain peril there for several hours.

DrAnnaHC
171
3 days ago

At least one has been seriously injured 😔 (source)

Darsol
209
3 days ago

Hopefully he recovers fully. He will never have to buy a drink or meal in Paris again.

RobertHannigan
25
3 days ago

Eh. Would be nice to believe that, but the pessimist in me says people will forget about him within a couple of months.

GearBrain
23
3 days ago

I remember reading an article about one of the guys who kicked a terrorist in the dick so hard he broke his own foot... in Scotland, IIRC. Dude was still getting free drinks years after the fact.

crshbndct
13
3 days ago

I hope he is fit enough to buy one, but never has to.

Your last sentence could go both ways.

six60six
360
3 days ago

The inside actually survived better than I imagined.

I’m not religious at all, but this image from a first responder account on twitter is pretty heavy.

https://i.imgur.com/780rhQ2.jpg

LeotheYordle
144
3 days ago

I simply cannot believe that it looks even that good. Those fires looked so intense, I thought for sure it was completely cooked.

grmmrnz
51
3 days ago

It's difficult for stone to burn.

jadeoracle
61
3 days ago

Yeah. I don't think people realize how much wood was in there, and then they forgot about the stone vaults. So it went lead roof, wood structure, stone vaults. Probably cooked like it was an oven, but mostly kept the heat and a lot of the flames traveling upwards. There will be water damage, but if they can stabilize the stone walls and remaining vaults....this is likely the best case scenario that could have happened today.

Estelindis
98
3 days ago

Seeing pictures like these gives me huge relief. Some aerial pictures gave the impression that the entire interior was ablaze. This is much more salvageable than I feared.

laraefinn_l_s
25
3 days ago

I went to sleep with death in my heart, positive that I would wake up to a pile of fuming debris. I jolted awake at two in the morning, couldn't go back to sleep, googled for news and found this picture. I'm so relieved.

naqunoeil
346
3 days ago

Latest pictures from the inside where the president was a few minutes ago :

https://twitter.com/LeGlobe_info/status/1117916635879198720

whitethane
359
3 days ago

That interior shot is really promising. A lot of the stain-glass was lost, but architecturally speaking the vaults and flying buttresses are just as important. Consensus was the vaults had collapsed, which appears to be at least partially untrue. The chairs being intact may be an indication that the 13c choir wall may have somewhat survived, as well as some of the interior woodwork.

The real tragedy, along with the glass, is the roof, many of the beams where 12c and the carpentry was extremely intricate.

pixel_of_moral_decay
117
3 days ago

I noticed this a little while ago. The vault is mostly intact. That's HUGE news they haven't really announced. It was assumed it was destroyed.

The vault seemingly did it's job and protected most of the inner cathedral itself from the worst of the possible damage. There's damage inside for sure, but 1000X less than if it had failed. The vault staying also means the walls are likely structurally sound at least for now and will stay so long enough for it to be reenforced if necessary. The vaults pretty much distribute the forces so the walls hold each other up as well as distribute the load from the (now gone) roof above it. So this is critical support we're talking about. If the vault was fully destroyed it would be a question of if the bell towers could be saved.

Exotemporal
32
3 days ago

It's crazy to think that most of the vault could resist to 500 tons of wood and 270 tons of lead (which was covering the roof) crashing down on it.

pixel_of_moral_decay
41
3 days ago

The arch is an amazingly strong design. Look at Roman structure still standing. The dominant design is an arch. Withstanding earthquakes and 2000 years of its own weight.

It’s half the engineering marvel of Notre Dame. The use of arches in the design.

Exotemporal
17
3 days ago

Of course, having the strength required to support the weight of the roof is one thing, but having the strength required to sustain all that weight crashing down is a different thing. It wasn't a given that it would hold and it didn't hold under the spire.

Exotemporal
89
3 days ago

It's crazy to think that some of the trees used to make the beams had been growing since the 9th century. They were made out of the same CO2 that came out of Charlemagne's lungs and the same solar energy that sunburnt the necks of Vikings. My cousin was watching the fire and could smell it, breathing carbon that had been sequestered in those 1,300 trees for almost all of France's history.

mltam
13
3 days ago

That IS pretty cool.

Think how old the CO2 in the coal we burn is, though. And oil...

InadequateUsername
72
3 days ago

LeGlobe reports that the Vicar archbishop is saying that the organ is seriously damaged.

Krabban
14
3 days ago

It seems when the spire collapsed it broke through the brick vault but then the fire didn't manage to spread too much in the nave of the church.

alaskafish
241
3 days ago

Trying to think positively, but being able to rebuild the Notre Dame will be good in the long run for future proofing. We can much easily make it safer for future generations to admire and modernize the building. From things like insulation, wiring, plumbing, etc. But also things like better wooden structures, and so forth.

It's unfortunate that we lost a lot of history today, but the important this is that we didn't lose it all, and we're at a position where we can have the Notre Dam for another 800 years.

PCGamerNL
20
3 days ago

Wise words

ManhattanThenBerlin
228
3 days ago

Thank fuck for medieval architects, they knew what they were doing

HellFuzzy
42
3 days ago

They left off the smoke detectors, though. We're better builders now I mean oh wait

Cr3X1eUZ
21
3 days ago

Knew what they were doing? The way I heard they just kept building stuff and got lucky when things didn't fall down.

literally_a_tractor
13
3 days ago

That's an interesting way of saying that your education was wasted on you.

sztormy
16
3 days ago

From your link:

The Early Gothic represented a series of experiments. As any other experiment some succeeded and some didn’t . Because of this, the Gothic builders had to rebuild many cathedrals which collapsed. 

mousefire55
92
3 days ago

IIRC, Notre-Dame de Paris has been laser-scanned.

654456
31
3 days ago

I would hope, I was more getting at that every place of historical importance should be.

sgtfuzzle17
11
3 days ago

It has been, I believe the maps for it are down to 5mm of resolution. The people restoring it will have all the help in the world.

ShivaSkunk777
159
3 days ago

I heard someone say a professor mapped it all out digitally before he died. I’m sure they’ll find his work invaluable to their efforts

SirBaldBear
105
3 days ago

Of all the things in the world, AC Unity is a fucking 1:1 recreation.

A3A6
37
3 days ago

Not to the level of intricacy of the carvings and stonework details. They just meant that it is "actual size" in game.

anthonykantara
134
3 days ago

French billionaire François-Henri Pinault, CEO of the Kering group, that owns Gucci, Yves Saint Laurent, Balenciaga, Alexander McQueen and many more, has pledged $113m USD towards rebuilding Notre-Dame Cathedral

Naxhu5
123
3 days ago

This is part of the ongoing story of the Notre Dame. 300 years from now they'll say, "surprisingly, the Praise Jesus laser show was not part of the original Gothic design..."

A3A6
28
3 days ago

I would go to a rave in the Notre Dame

aqua_vit
14
3 days ago

Lmao this made me laugh. I needed that thanks.

Rage1073
114
3 days ago

Few things to mention

  • there have been several other churches that have caught fire in the last couple of months in Paris, including the historic Saint-Sulpice

  • the fire started while tourists were still inside, which means that someone could have snuck away

  • the fire happened in one of the most holy weeks in the Christian religion

  • first reports were that at the time, there were no workers restoring the spire, that when the fire started, they had already left (although this seems to have been redacted but you can still find sources that are sticking to this)

This whole thing seems a little fishy, if not ominous. Is it intentional or accident, who knows, but very happy that almost no one was hurt and that the structure stands

PM_UR_UGLY_SWEATERS
54
3 days ago

Shame this post is found under ‘controversial’. Wonder why?

ysoseriouslymad
35
3 days ago

Is it a shame man? What about this do you believe is super duper informative and worthwhile to read....other than it vaguely insinuates things that you desperately wish were true? There’s no conclusions here. Dots with no lines, no proof, no empirical evidence that an intelligent mind would call a conclusions. Just stop with the pathetic groundless misinformation just because you’re scared it might not go your way.

wagsman
35
3 days ago

Because almost all of it is unverified or circumstantial. Even the mere speculation is dangerous because this is how fake news starts. Let’s wait for an actual investigation before we start changing the narrative.

Macintosh504
12
3 days ago

But when it comes to certain presidents and other people who reddit doesn’t generally like has this exact same sort of unverified speculation, they let it continue to happen and promote it.

stellacampus
100
3 days ago

It's bad but not disastrous: https://imgur.com/a/PboXRT0

S4mm1
20
3 days ago

That’s only a small part near the towers they could save. It’s still utterly disastrous. The rose windows are gone, the organ is damaged. This isn’t the rest of the cathedral.

Afalau
146
3 days ago

Although priceless artifacts have likely been destroyed

All indications are that they moved the artifacts out

IWasBornSoYoung
78
3 days ago

I've read this but don't understand. It says all art and artifacts have been saved but how could they really get everything out? Basically everything in there is significant it seems hard to believe they pulled it all out. We know some windows have been broken and statues have been lost already, so it seems odd they said they saved it all.

However I'm just reading translations so maybe some info is jumbled

ba-ba-ba-BarbaraAnn
137
3 days ago

They had already removed a lot of artwork before they started renovating, and tonight they removed the crown of thorns, the piece of the Cross, the treasure, and a few other things from the building in flames

Leharen
91
3 days ago

The fire started on the roof, not in the cathedral.

knot_city
21
3 days ago

I'm under the impression that they've saved the most significant stuff, like the diamonds out of a chest of precious stones.

Comnena
17
3 days ago

Museums and galleries have (or should have) disaster plans for exactly this scenario. They have records of all their artefacts, where they are in the building, which ones are the priorities, how they can be moved, and a place like Notre Dame probably has done some practice runs with their local fire brigade. That would have helped them in recovering objects.

YouSophisticat
61
3 days ago

The loss of art and history is truly saddening.

sevnofnine
13
3 days ago

We have modern sheet music because of the amazing people working there in the past. It's things like that which bring me to tears. There is probably something that we all hold dear, religious or not, that history in that place has impacted.

Ziggo001
9
3 days ago

Me too, buddy. It's been a rough evening.

SeattleGreySky
69
3 days ago

"The damage is not too bad, as long as the foundations are still strong, we can rebuild this place, it will become a haven for all people's and aliens of the universe"'

Wonderingperson
71
3 days ago

French billionaire François-Henri Pinault, chairman and CEO of the Kering luxury group, has pledged €100m (£86m; $113m) towards rebuilding Notre-Dame, according to a statement quoted by AFP news agency.

I sure hope more 1% come forth and does the same, Notre-Dame needs to be rebuilt.

Aeellron
69
3 days ago

Hey, can we all extend a thought for the guy that started the fire?

I was thinking about it today; I would feel guilty for the rest of my life.

Poor dude just made a mistake and must feel absolutely awful.

Shit happens. Everybody is human. We'll fix it.

rfilla
31
3 days ago

Sometimes I dread leaving the stove on and my house burns down. I would feel the guilt and shame for the rest of my life. I can't imagine if it was a cultural icon such as the Notre Dame. I've seen the facade in person and it's a beautiful behemoth of a structure.

zgh5002
14
3 days ago

If that poor guy's name ever get released I will fear for his safety. Everyone is human and they like to do fucked up shit.

LjLies
103
3 days ago

I heard two thirds of the roof were gone, but if I can venture a guess, I suspect the remaining third is probably too dodgy at this point to leave in place.

Keener1899
35
3 days ago

I believe the remaining part is the portion below the buttresses, covering the aisles. The roof over the nave looks completely burned in.

va_wanderer
15
3 days ago

There's a picture from above. The wood was well aged and highly fire-prone, so unless it fell away from the structure during the collapse, nothing is likely to remain from this hot a fire unburnt. There's a pic from a drone that shows Notre Dame is pretty much a shell full of hot coals at this point.

notjfd
39
3 days ago

I'm very very glad to correct you on that one. Beneath the wooden roof there's a stone vault, and it held up for most of the way. This is how it looks on the inside: https://twitter.com/CathedraleNotre/status/1117920118686851072

va_wanderer
25
3 days ago

That is a miracle given what it looked like from the outside. You can even see sparks at the top bleeding through in places, but that much intact?

Rejoice. They should be saying Masses across France for that kind of survival. If I didn't see it after what it looked like from above, I would not have believed it.

flexylol
55
3 days ago

It's a tragedy and seeing the picture of this amazing glass window made me sad....but as a European (who also comes from a city with a 700 year old cathedral and a 800 year "world heritage" bridge), let me tell you that "lots is happening" to historical structures in 800-900 years. Not just obvious destruction from fires and wars, also damage over time from air pollution and acid rain.

There is almost ALWAYS some work going on on these structures. So yes, it's horrible this happened, but this will be rebuilt like it already had been rebuilt a few times in the past. (Eg. the N.D. Spire was redone 150 years ago, it was already a replacement for the original spire which was damaged in a fire).

hereforthestrange
47
3 days ago

The framing inside that roof was pretty incredible. It was also there for 800 years. Some of this wood was almost a thousand years old.

lankywoman
47
3 days ago

When you miss a day of French duolingo

Baileys_Witch
37
3 days ago

Wow, what a relief. It'll probably take a butt fuck tonne of money to restore completely, but it's so good to hear that one of our relics didn't go down entirely. The Dame fought well.

zachwilson23
43
3 days ago

This is awesome news, but that fire looked intense. It's gonna take years and so much money to fix I'd imagine. Glad it didn't wasn't total destruction though. Take the positives where you can

AdmiralRed13
12
3 days ago

It was intense, there was 52 acres worth of lumber in that structure and that was just the roof and structure. That doesn’t include anything else that could have been fuel.

Hibernia624
34
3 days ago

I love all the people ignoring the historical and artistical value of this amazing building to criticize christianity.

Im not even religious. In fact i find Christianity really hypocritical, but people celebrating this are either 14 years old and immature, or just plain assholes.

This building has been around for over 800 years. Its effected so many lives in so many different ways. Its been around through all the wars and struggles we reference everyday.

And its being turned into a fucking joke by immature edgelords.

Steamed_Sugar
39
3 days ago

I'm not a fire fighter or a structural engineer or anything... I feel like this news developed fast.

In a single day the whole building went up in flames, it was put out (presumably), we figured out the cause of the fire, and we can say for certain that it can be salvaged.

I had always thought this process would take way longer.

va_wanderer
27
3 days ago

We don't have a cause yet (only speculation), but the only parts salvaged will be obvious- because it's the stone that's still standing, barring some miracle buried in the charred debris.

The structural components still standing are enough to rebuild on, although it's going to be like taking a skeleton and restoring the flesh in some kind of architectural resurrection. Billions in reconstruction costs, easily.

Reesareesa
14
3 days ago

Actually some photos have been released of the interior that give me hope, like this where you can still see wooden seats standing etc.

Still need to see the extent of the damage but considering the images from outside, I wasn’t expecting much.

va_wanderer
17
3 days ago

I was honestly expecting between the fire heating the stone and all that water that there'd be cracking and then flooding into the vault.

That it seems only one small portion near the altar gave way is a testament to it's builders. If the structural integrity is good or at least repairable, it's a sizeable chunk of the cathedral remaining to build anew from.

graysonmorgan
14
3 days ago

where has the cause been published?

PrimeraCordobes
12
3 days ago

We don’t know.

AbeRego
37
3 days ago

Silver lining: maybe we'll learn a lot more about the structure/construction than we otherwise could have.

Mrfrunzi
36
3 days ago

Get it firefighters! So happy to hear this!

BebopRocksteady82
36
3 days ago

I wonder how it caught on fire...

starman123
19
3 days ago

It's currently being investigated as an accident.

JimblesRombo
29
3 days ago

I bet my dad's work associate's daughter who everyone made fun of for getting a Master's in stained glass repair is laughing now

bestprocrastinator
18
3 days ago

That sounds like a field that is so niche, you are going to be raking in money if you make it.

Mof4z
26
3 days ago

I'm not an architect

I'm not a Parisian

I'm not even French

I've only been to this amazing building once in my life and I barely remember it.

Yet this entire situation has made me way more upset than I ever expected to be.

Wearenotme
22
3 days ago

Finally a glimmer of brightness in this sad story.

ImaginaryFriend2019
23
3 days ago

Strange at first to see a building bringing humanity together in these divisive times....but really it makes sense, this building was one of the pinnacles of human artistic achievement, and has been around since Middle Ages.

brig517
12
3 days ago

It’s part of the world’s history and is an example of the wonder than can be achieved.

FieryTyrant
20
3 days ago

Praise God

iamagainstit
21
3 days ago

FYI: the very similar Notre Dame de reims suffered a fire after being bombed in WW1 and was rebuilt from the vaulted ceilings

Edit:Fixed. Captis_damno may be an ass, but they are correct, I had originally mistaken the Notre Dame de Reims for the Notre Dame de Paris

EastBayRae
20
3 days ago

The rebuilt Windsor Castle from images after the fire, this will take longer but can be redone.

__WellWellWell__
19
3 days ago

The history books will describe the fire of Notre Dame. It will note the details of whatever findings are yet to come, the preservation and rebuilding that will happen. It will show before, during and after pictures. And it will show the masses of Parisians and tourists surrounding the cathedral singing hymns as their historical monument burned. The world has lost a very important piece of history today, but we're also part of it.

melancious
18
3 days ago

I couldn't sleep all night thinking about the fire. I visited it a year ago and was blown away. I don't know why I'm hurting for a building, but I do. The humanity cannot lose it. And religion has nothing to do with it.

Hibernia624
21
3 days ago

I love all the people ignoring the historical and artistical value of this amazing building to criticize christianity.

Im not even religious. In fact i find Christianity really hypocritical, but people celebrating this are either 14 years old and immature, or just plain assholes.

This building has been around for over 800 years. Its effected so many lives in so many different ways. Its been around through all the wars and struggles we reference everyday.

And its being turned into a fucking joke by immature edgelords.

cedarhat
13
3 days ago

I’m an atheist who really loves Cathedrals for their history, art and architecture.

The world has lost a treasure. The entire building was built by human and horse power, from stone cutting to building the roof. The Gothic style is amazing, especially when you think about the dark heavy buildings that were built earlier.

Agentleman89
19
3 days ago

Big relief. I occasionally read comments on conservative sites like fox or t-d (i know) and people are convinced muslims did this. They're also taking it as a sign of western civilization collapsing. I don't know if they're really sincere in those beliefs, but what a sad world that must be.

reenact12321
16
3 days ago

It and famous cathedrals all over the world (like most great structures made of wood) have had fires, collapses, been shelled, been just ignored.... and been rebuilt, Notre Dame is no exception. Half the reason it even had the spire was because the original roof was rotting off until Victor Hugo made the place a national focus with his book and renovation got serious. I think this may be a true Phoenix moment for the cathedral's history. People won't take it for granted and realize just how much it meant to the city and the French people and it will get rebuilt and preserved with great gusto. (and now you don't have to worry about preservation work when putting in sprinklers HINT HINT builders)

BonerWizardDelux
16
3 days ago

Thank you to the firefighters. They're heroes for saving this piece of history. Without them we would have lost everything.

57ashdot
15
3 days ago

Imagine your legacy being the person that accidentally caused a fire thar burnt down half of Notre Dame

Tator5328
15
3 days ago

Translated to fire-ese: We managed to save your home’s foundation.

NinjaHatred
16
3 days ago

I leave in less than 3 months to fly to Paris for my first visit. Was excited to see the Church. Just sad for so many reasons about this. Hopefully the people who are working to restore are invested for the right reasons.

Exotemporal
18
3 days ago

You'll be able to see the cathedral at a very important point in its history.

It reminds me of my trip to New York City. My girlfriend and I (both from France) arrived in the city on July 4, 2004, the day of the ceremony that marked the beginning of the construction of the new World Trade Center. At this point, the entire block was the biggest hole I had ever seen and I feel like it was very special to have seen it in this state.

Penis-Waffles
14
3 days ago

Its great news but it feels like telling someone who lost a loved one:

"Well his body's still intact...".

But still good news!

A3A6
23
3 days ago

More like your loved one could have died but all that happened was they lost a limb, which can actually be regrown since he's a building.

savvysearch
13
3 days ago

I think it’s more akin to saying that he’s still alive and that there’s still hope that he can be saved.

fuzzylogistics
14
3 days ago

I'm an athiest and this still gets me in the feels. It was such a beautiful, truly marvelous, historic structure.

Knitaddict
12
3 days ago

I pray it was an accident. If it was deliberately started, God help the evil human ( and anyone associated with them) who did it.

amishelectric
12
3 days ago

I am but one guy on the internet who feels compelled to help somehow?

Maybe we can start a worldwide grass roots movement to help supply old growth wood for the restoration? Old growth reclamation is huge here in Pennsylvania Dutch country where I am from.

I don’t know. I just look at the pictures of the devastation and I want to help my brothers and sisters in France.

Kharn85
13
3 days ago

I’m glad I got a chance to see it this past fall, was truly amazing. I hate that others might not get the same opportunity.

[deleted]
11
3 days ago

[removed]

Instant_Noodlez
14
3 days ago

While I feel relieved this didn't happen when the building was full, it is still horrible to lose all that history. People poured their time, talent, soul into the building and art to leave an immortal piece of themselves behind, to touch those of us in the here and now. And just like that, all gone.