The good old days
57881 upvotes
1078 comments
BigBoyzGottaEat
1 week ago
The good old days
spoikins
6199
1 week ago

Me: *playing Mario Kart or whatever all day*

My mom: Please go be unsupervised for several hours. Go make friends with kids I don't know. For the love of God get out of the house

Sal_Bundry_5TDs1Game
1275
1 week ago

Good idea. Kids these days are so asocial that I don't see how they can possibly function in the reel world. My kids got a different treatment. I wood periodically kick them out of the house for a month at a time to live on they're own so they'd learn to function. I started doing this when they were 10, and while they'd usually come back bruised and crying (my doter got rapped twice but it's ok (because I found and beet up the rappers until they got comma toes (their still in commas))), and now there fully functional adults who can fend for themselfs in the reel world. That's parenting done write!

COMMENT ALTERATION #☝️: thank you for the recognition, frends. It's great to know that a true Legend of Football like myself (5 touchdowns in 1 game in high school) is being recognized for his achievements, which are vital to culture and the progression of mankind. Keep up those uploads, never get married, and keep playing football! Whoooooooooooa Bundry!

creed6465
658
1 week ago

Your grammar was too good in the first two sentences. I almost thought you were serious.

Sal_Bundry_5TDs1Game
254
1 week ago

Why wood I not be serious? I don't lie on the internet. I have nothing to gain from it (what man with a 9.83" SALamander (that's big, by the way) would have to lie for gratification?). It makes no sans. Either way, I'm heppy that Rebbit is recognizing and appreciating my highly developed parenting skills.

KK9521
118
1 week ago

Why is he getting downvoted? It's obviously the great Sal Bundry who scored 5 touchdowns in 1 game

CouchMountain
13
1 week ago

This guy is all over Reddit. A lot of people hate him, some people love him. I love it.

KK9521
12
1 week ago

Same, it's hilarious when he just pisses off a bunch of people

burninrock24
2
1 week ago

He’s a troll clone of 3YearLetterman on twitter

CouchMountain
4
1 week ago

I know, but who cares.

DumBoBumBoss
10
1 week ago

IKR kids these days need to respect the legends of the game like Sal (5TDs in 1 game)

DocSampson
3
1 week ago

He can throw a football over a mountain.

Lndbrghwrstlr
2
1 week ago

God I'm ready for this to be the birth of a meme.

KK9521
4
1 week ago

I thought it was already, I atleast thought it was a reddit inside meme

YetisInAtlanta
27
1 week ago

Man 5tds in one game. That really is something

superbreadninja
3
1 week ago

I’ve always wanted to ask... how did you get the 5TDs? Did you throw them all? Were they all interception returns? How did you accomplish such a feat?

killanight
98
1 week ago

I was thinking it was serious And planned if i ever have children of doing the same but then i kept reading

ThisIsJustATr1bute
20
1 week ago

TIFU by taking parenting advice from Reddit.

Shots-and-squats
6
1 week ago

They had us in the first half

grubblenub
7
1 week ago

I love it for that. Getting to read his grammar dissolve over each word is very fun.

Beastly4k
36
1 week ago

You get a lot of shit across reddit but i really admire your dedication.

Pickles256
27
1 week ago

This wouldn’t be nearly as funny if your grammar and spelling didn’t get progressively worse like you had a stroke and kept typing

BiNumber3
3
1 week ago

I mean, he is a football legend, scoring 5 touchdowns in one game. So wouldn't be surprised if he had a few concussions.

catzarrjerkz
26
1 week ago

Ken M is that you?

I_DRINK_MTN_DEW
95
1 week ago

Are you serious? That's the legend himself, Sal Bundry, an actual football god. He scored 5 touchdowns in 1 game in highschool.

forcedtomakeaccount9
10
1 week ago

I miss Married With Children & MAD TV. Fox use to have some really hilarious stuff.

catzarrjerkz
4
1 week ago

My apologies I didnt realize i was in the presence of a true football legend

typicaljuan
9
1 week ago

Fuck up some commas

surfekatt
5
1 week ago

I know that was comedy/satire (idk what called) but we don’t go out enough, we teens

1mikeg
3
1 week ago

Toilet flushes. Audience cheers.

InsignificantOcelot
2
1 week ago

Go Bundry!

rakki9999112
2
1 week ago

Wow you've got some tags thanks to masstagger (and your behaviour(I know this is a novelty)).

Low quality user.

Troll.

Low quality local commenter.

Sub Troll.

Troll in /r/politics.

You should comment in some hate subs to try and pick up "Deplorable" too.

LeJusDeTomate
2
1 week ago

Were your children able to score 5 touchdowns in 1 game after that ?

blubat26
2
1 week ago

This motherfucking legend.

Zelkh9
2
1 week ago

It’s funny how he gets highly upvoted now that people get the joke

Optiguy42
2
1 week ago

Sal you're a legend keep doing what you're doing. You get a big NO MA'AM from me.

CaillousRevenge
1037
1 week ago

"What about going over to Mr. Gacy's house? He dresses as a clown and kids go in all the time and never come out. That's how much fun they're having!"

lundyforlife22
378
1 week ago

“Maybe ask if he’ll show you that rope trick he keeps talking about.”

Beo1
93
1 week ago
Reorz
45
1 week ago

r/lpotl

Also happy cake day!

lundyforlife22
17
1 week ago

hail yourself!

Reorz
2
1 week ago

Hail Gein!

Reorz
2
1 week ago

Megustalations!

gambitx007
2
1 week ago

I listened to one of their podcasts a while ago but they make a damn joke every 20 seconds. Like im trying to listen to the damn story what did he do to her!

swamplander1202
10
1 week ago

Look underneath the house there

HeyItsN0b0dy
5
1 week ago

Find the few living things, rotting fast, in their sleep

drawerdrawer
4
1 week ago

Sufjan out

Sixstringsickness
2
1 week ago

That's not the scary part of that songs...

It's the "at my best I am just like him" or something to that effect. That's the scary part.

vortigaunt64
28
1 week ago

He really knew the ins and outs of child-rearing.

DarkwingDuckHunt
3
1 week ago

Sir and/or Madam,

You are going to hell.

But so am I for laughing so damn hard at this.

1mikeg
469
1 week ago

"Everyone know you never got laid, dad."

bassinine
188
1 week ago

'dad, i get laid more than you and i play video games 8 hours a day.'

pfunk42529
160
1 week ago

You're here aren't you? That means I actually fucked your mom, not like the little shit's you talk to on that headset.

Hermeran
122
1 week ago

yeah well done dad. Of all the things you could have done in life you went and made me

what a loser

pfunk42529
77
1 week ago

Yeah, your sister came out great, we should have stopped at one.

undercooked_lasagna
27
1 week ago

She got mom's looks.

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)

YellowJesus8803
16
1 week ago

Jaime?

z-vap
4
1 week ago
theta270
3
1 week ago

Oh shit, she still lets you believe that. You do know that the mailman is my real dad.

pfunk42529
3
1 week ago

Nah, you're too much of a cunt to be that nice man's kid.

earned_potential
2
1 week ago

Video or it never happened Dad!

ThisIsJustATr1bute
13
1 week ago

counts siblings

More than twice, anyway.

harshtruthsbiches
2
1 week ago

So you think.

sinkwiththeship
6
1 week ago

Dad: "fuck your entire life bud. Your mom got so wet last night, Trudeau had to deploy a National Guard unit to stack sandbags around my bed."

James_Locke
5
1 week ago

Well son, I guess it’s a good time to tell you that you were adopted.

ClicksAndASmell
171
1 week ago

When I was your age, we watched other people play football. Like men.

bertcox
64
1 week ago

other people play football. they bend over wearing skin tight lycra, the best looking guy will reach under the biggest guys ass, and tap him on the inner thigh Like men.

ClicksAndASmell
51
1 week ago

We'd gather in the house with the biggest television, so that we could make out every jiggle on those muscular behemoths as they pile on top of each other. And then when it came time for the show put on by attractive women they hired specifically to dance between plays, we'd go to the bathroom, and get snacks, and do everything but look at the screen. Because we're not a bunch of homos, like your generation.

sluthmongor
20
1 week ago

I would sit there for hours captivated by their big muscles and large buttockses. I would dream all night vivid dreams of them slobbering all over a football as I took them from behind. Completing my play all over their linebackers Oh those were the days. All you kids dress like faggots today!

shewan3
5
1 week ago

I'm having an odd reaction of laughing and triggered at the same time.

MoreMartinthanMartin
53
1 week ago

Accuracy: 100%

ViciousAsparagusFart
7
1 week ago

Insert homoerotic football copypasta here

AncileBooster
2
1 week ago

To be fair, playing football was much more fun than watching it as a kid. Playing huge tackle football games during lunch at school was great until the teachers started breaking up the games.

P4_Brotagonist
6
1 week ago

I felt that way but it was more like "When I was your age we fought each other who actually got to play the game first."

C4H8N8O8
2
1 week ago

MSI?

Cocaineandmojitos710
179
1 week ago

Love the scene in Parks and Rec where they announce the city parks will be closed in the summer, and a woman asks

"School is out in two weeks. What am I going to do with my kids all day? Keep them in my house? Where I live?"

TheEstonianSpy
146
1 week ago

why don't you go out with your friends, instead of staying in and playing games?

Because my friends are also staying in and playing games, mom.

thereforeyexist
123
1 week ago

Because we have no money mom and a cup of coffee costs $6

ScratchinWarlok
99
1 week ago

Because its phoenix and its 121 outside.

Rudy_Ghouliani
91
1 week ago

It shouldn't even exist. It's a monument to Mans arrogance.

blubat26
41
1 week ago

The fact that we had the sheer fucking testicles to set up a city in the middle of a fuck-you industrial furnace of a desert really says something about us, dunnit?

l00pee
17
1 week ago

It wasn't bad until we installed all the concrete. People have been here thousands of years.

worldpvpisbestpvp
2
1 week ago

So what you're telling me is that concrete is what's really behind climate change 🤔

Gangsterpete
5
1 week ago

In a way, yes actually. Concrete production produces a shitload of greenhouse gases.

aaj617
6
1 week ago

Plus the urban heat island effect makes cities hotter than the surrounding area so more AC needed for everyone

l00pee
2
1 week ago

I'm saying it creates heat. Lots.

Betty_Bookish
2
1 week ago

Gibbs? That you?

blubat26
3
1 week ago

I don't understand that reference.

Betty_Bookish
2
1 week ago

Gibbs is a character from the Commune series. Reddit famous for landing an A+ superstar narrator for the audio book during an AMA. R.c. Bray makes that character awesome.

Well, my point is, you sound like him.

AnthemJavelin
4
1 week ago

Peggy Hill!

Bearfan001
2
1 week ago

It's weird but as a kid that didn't stop me from playing outside. As an adult though it just drains the life from me.

P4_Brotagonist
5
1 week ago

That's because as a kid your body had smaller overall mass, so it was much easier to cool. Same reason that kids can run for what seems like ages and bounce back within a few minutes. Also the same reason they can fall like 20 feet and mostly be ok. Smaller body and weight means less mass to maintain.

Bearfan001
2
1 week ago

This was a really good ELI5. Thank you.

ILikeSugarCookies
2
1 week ago

121 in Phoenix is way easier to deal with than 95 in East Texas through Florida.

ascendant_tesseract
3
1 week ago

It can be, but there's nothing quite like feeling the water evaporate our of our body the moment you step outside. There's a reason the Indigenous tribes out here were mostly active at night

inquisitive27
2
1 week ago

I miss the bars that had pennies off per degree over 100. Not that I went cause I was inside playing video games...but they were fun to talk about.

buddboy
5
1 week ago

I'm very small and have no money so you can imagine the kind of stress I'm under!

SimplyQuid
2
1 week ago

/r/unexpectedyouknowthedrill

Fuckenjames
2
1 week ago

Oh those invisible kids playing outside in the neighborhood?

PoEandPolitics2
2
1 week ago

My mom was actually like OP but I just played video games all day like you so she was pretty happy with that.

MaxBonerstorm
2
1 week ago

Which I didn't realize until recently is because parents want alone time. It's selfish entirely and they would rather you go be bored outside and have time to do whatever than have you in the house.

poopyheadthrowaway
2
1 week ago

I spent prom playing Mario Kart.

Napkin_whore
2
1 week ago

TRY DRUGS, SON.

Audric_Sage
2
1 week ago

Lmao, my mother was exactly like this... she begged me to go out and do something stupid and get in trouble cause I was such a shut in.

loganparker420
2
1 week ago

Me but Pokemon, RuneScape, and Animal Crossing.

illgot
2
1 week ago

My parents kept telling me to go to parties and have fun like a normal teenager.

I never went to parties and I was a normal teenager.

Emilnilsson
2
1 week ago

Bet it was just for our parents to get some time to have sex without the risk of the kids walking in on them

ArcticDruidYuppie
2
1 week ago

My mother literally locked me out of the house and said to ‘go make more friends’ to me in 4th grade. I literally was just chilling up in my room not bothering anyone as usual.

I went to the library.

rustygrunt
2
1 week ago

What about conkers bad fur day?

dayburner
2149
1 week ago

A friend had the cops called on her because her grade school kids were playing in the front yard unattended.

Khir
1148
1 week ago

There was an article in the NYT a while back about a mom who had the cops called on her for leaving her child in a locked car, windows cracked and everything (wasn't in the summer), playing on an iPad while she ran into the CVS that was right there for eight minutes. She came back and the kid barely knew she was gone, but the cops were there. It's gotten to be insanity.

EDIT: Here's the article link: https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/27/opinion/sunday/motherhood-in-the-age-of-fear.html

Siliceously_Sintery
694
1 week ago

Joe Rogan had a sociology professor on his show, Jonathan Haidt, who wrote “the coddling of the American mind”.

They discuss overprotecting children, but also that children currently need protection from social media at a young age because it’s causing huge problems in middle school, especially in girls.

Great podcast, 2 hours of super interesting stuff out of Haidt’s materials.

Edit: episode 1221.

Mox5
398
1 week ago

So in other words, kids need less protection irl, and more protection online.

I'm curious how the child abduction rates are in the West.

Awightman515
249
1 week ago

kids need more protection from real threats, and less protection from imaginary ones

Goldfishdart
73
1 week ago

This is interesting because these real threats are ones people originally thought were imaginary

LetsHaveTon2
31
1 week ago

The way she goes

reposc85
14
1 week ago

Da fucken way of the road, boys

nine_legged_stool
2
1 week ago

Fuckin' way she goes, Randy

UseCaseX
2
1 week ago

Wait, what were the imaginary threats?

Goldfishdart
2
1 week ago

The real threats being the effect that social media has on children vs the "imaginary" threats being something happening to them in real life, which is much less likely to impact them unlike social media.

NAISOO
14
1 week ago

don't let your kids create social media accounts

problem fucking solved.

lukereuter
20
1 week ago

Hard to do when everyone in class has one and all the kids base so much of their relationships around it

PeculiarCocktail
7
1 week ago

Yeah I've thought a lot about this and dont claim to know the right answer but the best I have is to educate them about social media generally and how it can skew perceptions of reality.

It's nearly impossible to keep them away from it when they're getting older and strictly prohibiting it seems to just make it more attractive. So similar to dealing with drugs, alcohol, porn, sex and whatnot, I think the best route is just being open and honest and to really try to help young people make informed decisions and distinguish fact from fiction when the lines might seem blurry.

But idk I'm just a dad trying to figure out how I'm going to approach these things as my kids grow up. Drawing on my own experience as a kid/young adult, I think this is the best route.

DntBanMeBro
2
1 week ago

I feel bud. My daughter's 3. Im just hoping she'll think her dad is cool and it'll be cool not to have social media like her dad. Lol. (No i dont exactly consider reddit social media it is but isnt)

eltoro
3
1 week ago

Anonymous usernames definitely makes a big difference.

gottahavemytunes
3
1 week ago

How exactly do you go about doing that? They can make an account whenever they want

nickoo321
2
1 week ago

No that's retarded

TheJollyLlama875
20
1 week ago

I'm not gonna say that predators aren't an issue but I think online bullying from peers is probably a more widespread issue.

AppleBerryPoo
4
1 week ago

And the adoption of unrealistic beauty/fashion/status etc that gets pushed on every social media source

_Bumble_Bee_Tuna_
42
1 week ago

If they want the kid after 70,000 years they can have it.

P4_Brotagonist
7
1 week ago

Some days if they want it after 5 minutes they can have it.

AlanmanAaron
3
1 week ago

i like your interrobang

Narezza
2
1 week ago

I like that you know what it was!

flvaon
2
1 week ago

How could that be proven false?

AcornPancake
11
1 week ago

It wasn't proven false that it never happens, but it's been shown that most kidnapping is done by family members, instead of strangers. The person most likely to kidnap a child is the child's mother.

bertcox
19
1 week ago

That 200 includes teen girls that were wined and dined by the kidnapper. If you are looking for kid yanked off street by guy in van, thats super super rare. But its the one everybody freaks out about the most. Watch your neighbors, creepy uncles/aunts, teachers, pastors. Guy driving creepy van, giving out ice cream is probably pretty safe.

mazer_rack_em
23
1 week ago

I'm curious how the child abduction rates are in the West.

lowest per capita in history.

fearthepib
18
1 week ago

Almost non-existent. The issue is. That is cold comfort when it does happen.

OtherPlayers
13
1 week ago

As a flip-side; your child is literally 7 times more likely to die in a car accident (~700 per year, ignoring the 128,000 injured per year) than they are to be abducted by a stranger (and note that some of those abducted children are recovered).

It’s literally many times more dangerous to put your child in your car and drive them to/from the store than the risk of them being abducted while you are there.

But abductions get headline publicity and car accidents don’t.

flvaon
4
1 week ago

Well we don't really know what raises the risk of abduction from the general risk. So while the baseline is 200 per year, it may be that leaving your child alone in a public place increases that risk. Most people don't do that, because they fear stranger abductions.

Patchpen
3
1 week ago

But abductions get headline publicity and car accidents don’t.

Publicity can help save a kidnapped child. It can't help one who has been run over.

bertcox
2
1 week ago

Child abduction rates have never been lower. If your counting stranger abductions. Family shit will always happen, but stranger danger, more likely to get bitten by sharks. 80 total kids in 17, and they recovered 30 of them alive. That sounds like a lot, but thats 60M kids in the US, and only 80 got kidnapped.

probablyuntrue
139
1 week ago

Yea that's crazy....Jamie, pull up that video of that ape on DMT

Aukos
43
1 week ago

Have you ever tried elk meat?

forcedtomakeaccount9
25
1 week ago

Do you see the nuts on that thing?

columnarjoint
10
1 week ago

Chimp will go for the nuts first. They know what makes you human.

twinsofliberty
2
1 week ago

yall need more memes

Snannybobo
37
1 week ago

My sociology class this semester opened my eyes to a lot of ways technology affect us. We are much less independent because we expect to be able to instantly contact anyone we want, and kids grow up from a young age being tethered to their phones, being coddled.

I try not to communicate over the phone too much now, and if/when I have kids I will definitely limit their screen usage. That's coming from a computer science major too :p

Siliceously_Sintery
27
1 week ago

Yeah Haidt says kids should have dumb tech, and definitely no phones in the bedroom at night. Kills their sleeping habits.

Schools need to enforce no devices in elementary so that kids have to learn through direct contact with other children.

tmurrayart
12
1 week ago

It'll be interesting to see what becomes of the kids who stay up til 3am on iPads. Their brains will be cooked by the time they're teens, and probably in decline in their 20's.

Siliceously_Sintery
15
1 week ago

It’s more they won’t make it to 20’s because of intense anxiety and depression. If you’re not getting sleep as you grow, you’re fucked. That’s hard science.

Karmaze
14
1 week ago

To be fair I went through that when I was a kid 30 years ago. The anxiety and depression was the cause, not the effect.

Siliceously_Sintery
4
1 week ago

It was massively rarer 30 years ago, compared to today. The rates at which young adults are suffering anxiety and depression. I recommend the podcast, they talk about visible signs in things like university that are proving his points.

I hear you saying you were one of those though, I don’t want to diminish that that must have been hard. I’m glad you made it out ok.

gardeneia
5
1 week ago

A lot of that has to do with the political climate and the actual climate, not phones. Politicians are actively trying to ruin everyone’s lives and we’re powerless to stop climate change which has already begun to affect us. We know we’re the ones that are going to have to deal with the consequences. Not to mention the fact that we see a school shooting on TV every other day, though that’s an American thing. I genuinely refuse to have kids in the future 10-20 years down the road because I know they’d be even more fucked than my generation is.

razzatazzjazz
3
1 week ago

Kids on their iPads are usually just watching a show. We don't have wild and ridiculous concerns and fears for kids who are glued to the television.

My dad's an engineer so we've always have had a computer and I had access to it from the age of 8 or so. I'd be up for hours on the computer and now, at the age of 27, I can say that I did not get any brain damage from using a computer late at night.

Looking back, a few pedophiles tried to lure me away and it almost worked. My parents had no idea. When I have a kid I'm going to monitor the shit out of their internet use.

columnarjoint
3
1 week ago

Fu. Ily enough another great episode of Joe Rogan was the guy talking about sleep especially for kids. Can't remember his name.

Snannybobo
3
1 week ago

I've noticed that too. Hell, I even try to limit myself. I spend so much time looking at screens for school and work, whenever I have free time I try to do anything EXCEPT look at a screen haha.

Siliceously_Sintery
5
1 week ago

Yep, he talks about that too. Boy bullying isn’t usually emotional, it’s physical. Social media didn’t really increase that, too much. Girls bully just as much, but it’s more mental, excluding each other. Social media has made that WAY easier to do, 24/7.

abbypaigeallen
4
1 week ago

What number is this on JRE?? Super interested in listening to it

Siliceously_Sintery
2
1 week ago

1221, it’s really good. As a teacher, it’s getting shared around to other new teachers in my district.

madcapfrowns
2
1 week ago

Jonathan Haidt is fantastic. I'm reading one of his books called The Righteous Mind right now. Def recommend people check out his books if not the podcast at the very least.

Khir
53
1 week ago

Sure, but escalating to the cops when you see a kid sitting in the car alone on a cool March day with the windows cracked tells you something in and of itself.

jwmosher
5
1 week ago

The person may have had no idea how long the mom was gone. I know I would be hesitant to approach a car with just a kid in it as well because the parent might freak out if they happen to come out then.

flea1400
6
1 week ago

The article states:

It took me a while to figure out what had taken place in the parking lot — that a stranger had watched me go into the store, recorded my son, recorded the license plate on my mother’s car and called 911.

They saw her leave the car so they were well aware of how long she had been gone. There's another article about it here, which explains that the person who called it in videoed the entire time she was in the store and called 911 after she left in her car with the kid.

https://www.salon.com/2014/06/03/the_day_i_left_my_son_in_the_car/

FPSXpert
2
1 week ago

1 - leave car 2 - ask kid how long parent is gone 3 - if longer than 10 minutes, go inside and ask staff to call over PA to make sure everything is OK

Instead the lady decided to be a punk b---- and call in the cops to deal with it. Idk about where they live but where I live you only call them in if somebody being tazed or shot will make the situation better.

LifeIsDeBubbles
3
1 week ago

8 minutes? That seems a little hard to believe.

Khir
51
1 week ago

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/07/27/opinion/sunday/motherhood-in-the-age-of-fear.html

The article says five minutes, so I was overestimating.

dayburner
279
1 week ago

A lot of people really have lost the sense of communal property. I think this is directly related to people's fear of being sued. Used to be kids could play in an empty lot. Now it's full of not trespassing signs because if Timmy falls and twist his ankle his parents might sue. Now we're at the point where kids can't be at the public park unsupervised.

bassinine
167
1 week ago

talking about communal property, when i was younger (like 18 probably) and just got my first new car i took a wrong turn in a neighborhood where my friend lived.

it was a dead end, so as i was turning around this little monster of a dog jumps in front of my car, barks viciously, and refuses to move (clearly not trained at all). so i try to shoo it and beep a little bit, still acting like it was to attack my bumper, so i drive like 1 mph to try to get it out of the way.

so, as the most vicious 30 pound dog i've ever seen is blocking my way - it's owners come up to my car and start berating me about 'being in their neighborhood, trying to scare their dog because i revved my engine.' i was so confused, so i just rolled my eyes at them, so they starting screaming at me, telling me to leave or they're gonna call the cops.

i'm just like, wtf is happening? like, i'm in my car, driving on the road, and your shitty dog blocked me. wtf do you want me to do, just run over it so i can 'get the fuck out of your neighborhood'?

weirdest thing that's ever happened to me.

Ruby_Bliel
60
1 week ago

That would be some r/MaliciousCompliance material. Running over his dog because he ordered you to leave at once.

BoD80
58
1 week ago

No you let him call the cops and then he gets a ticket for a leash law.

spaceman_slim
51
1 week ago

One time some teenagers were having some kinda crisis in the street in front of my house and 2 girls were lying in my yard crying their asses off and I had to come out and ask them to do that somewhere else. I felt so cantankerous.

SoTotallyGruntled
62
1 week ago

“Hey... yeeeaaaahh... could you like sob somewhere else? Yeaaah that’d be greeaat.”

ClikeX
48
1 week ago

"Your crying is lowering my property value. I already got the HOA on my ass."

ATXballer
9
1 week ago

Lol why didnt you just ask what's wrong?

spaceman_slim
22
1 week ago

Because I have a whole family of my own to deal with and a pair of wailing 14 year olds is not my responsibility. Their entourage was very polite and quick to scurry them off somewhere else.

ATXballer
2
1 week ago

I'm not saying you should or shouldnt, just a question of why. But yea I get it.

Jingr
8
1 week ago

Once I parked in a neighborhood that was being built, I was only near empty lots, talking to my girlfriend on the phone. A guy came from a block away screaming that I was a danger to his kids who sometimes play outside. It was really weird.

KingKooooZ
3
1 week ago

Just a few weeks ago I was on a 3 hour drive. had been on the highway with nothing around for the last hour and needed to get something out of the trunk. So I pulled over on a side road/driveway that looped back to the highway.

By the time I closed my trunk this guy on a golf cart was there and started asking what I was doing, said 'I just don't know why you came here'.

Eventually I just left, like I would have if he left me alone.

KuKluxCon
2
1 week ago

My neighborhood had a park in it and once me and my friends parked next to the park which was across the street from a few houses. We were just sitting there hanging when a guy comes out and tells us we need to move along or he is gonna call the cops. Like bruh we weren't even on your side of the road...

MediocrePenisNumber6
150
1 week ago

But there is a pedophile behind every bush /s.

Seriously the whole crime show fad created a wave of paranoia that has lead to kids not learning to be independent and not knowing how to solve problems. Playing outside is a great classroom for real world skills.

dayburner
65
1 week ago

The inverse is true now as well. Adults don't know how to operate in a world with children in it.

CajunTurkey
30
1 week ago

And the movie "Children of Men" showed that adults don't know how to operate in a world without children in it.

OvationEmulation
36
1 week ago

So what we're saying is that adults don't know how to operate. Sounds about right.

Shots-and-squats
23
1 week ago

Can confirm, am adult, no fucking idea what I'm doing.

Sagemasterba
11
1 week ago

Being an adult is so much easier when you realize there is no set way of doing things and you just have to make it up as you go along. Use your experience, knowledge, and heart to guide you and you will be alright.

Zandrick
2
1 week ago

That's good when you have experience and knowledge.

_Bumble_Bee_Tuna_
2
1 week ago

Fake it til you make it.

CptJaunLucRicard
4
1 week ago

This. I'm a parent and terrified of my daughter roaming the neighborhood on her own. Not because of crime, or pedophilia, or abduction, because of the way people drive.

Suburban, neighborhood side streets, and people fly around doing 45-50 blindly jumping hills and corners. It's like people forgot how to drive in places where children might be present some time in the last 20 years.

Aukos
18
1 week ago

Yeah, when I was in Grade School I walked to and from school and was then home alone for about an hour and a half until my mom got off work. I couldn't even imagine not being able to go to the neighborhood park that was literally across the street. What?

umlaut
11
1 week ago

Same. No cell phones, either - just had to fend for ourselves if there was a problem. We had distance limits and a set of rules that kept us safe.

I don't know how people expect to end up with adults if you never give children some autonomy.

chula198705
72
1 week ago

I had a cop show up at my door because my 4-year-old was sitting in our driveway watching her dad walk to work and he deemed it "dangerous". And then he said she wasn't dressed properly for the weather, and even though I insisted she's smart enough to come inside if she's cold, we got a visit from CPS a few weeks later. Such fucking bullshit and I'm still pissed off about it.

bwvdub
38
1 week ago

My son goes to the same elementary school I did. When he got to first grade, I quit making him take a coat to school. It was not a battle I wanted to fight EVERY DAMN DAY. And he wanted to wear shorts and funny tall socks instead of pants. Fine. The school asked me if I needed to use the coat pantry like I was poor and unfortunate. These people know me and my family. Some of them were teachers when I was there. And they’re giving me shit about letting a kid be a kid. No thanks, he has plenty of clothes and chooses to leave them at home. His choice. When he gets cold, he’ll put on warmer stuff. And, spoiler alert !, he will also come to school with scraped knees, a forehead medically glued back together on occasion, and bruised bits because he crashes bikes, walks, runs, plays and falls (jumps lol) off things. And if wearing that damn jacket would keep him safe forever I’d hermetically seal him in that motherfucker but it won’t!

wingfire
3
1 week ago

Thank gawd I grew up on a farm. We were expected to be outside getting dirty until dinner time.

bwvdub
4
1 week ago

It’s not a real farm unless you were out there getting dirty while you were working the farm. Gotta contribute. Gotta eat. No, really. My dad was raised on a farm too in ND. And my mom’s dad raised crops on his place but it wasn’t a commercial farm. And we still live out here, land of no sidewalks. And I’m grateful every day. I worry about copperheads, not strangers.

ThreeLeggedTranny
45
1 week ago

In Illinois, that is illegal until the kid is 14. That means it is illegal to let a literal teenager (13) play unsupervised.

CowahBull
28
1 week ago

Damn I was babysitting 4 kids by the age of 12. I WAS the supervisor before IL would have said I could be without a supervisor myself. This was 2006.

BioKram
8
1 week ago
Amazing_Construction
2
1 week ago

Parents can be charged with child abandonment if they leave children under the age of 13 alone for 24 hours or more without supervision by someone over the age of 14.

So not totally unreasonable.

nickoo321
3
1 week ago

Is this a dream?

earned_potential
3
1 week ago

That's crazy. I grew up in the desert. Even when we were in junior high, we'd ride our bikes out in the middle of nowhere in the 110 degree heat, exploring the desert, catching snakes. I can't imagine missing out on all that.

ThreeLeggedTranny
2
1 week ago

Yeah, I grew up in the rural Midwest. I spent more time out in the woods unsupervised than I did under supervision. It literally helped define who I am. Id be a completely different person without those experiences, and there is no way of knowing, but I dont feel like itd be a better person.

totalbanger
3
1 week ago

From my earliest, rural midwest memories, parenting seemed to mainly be, "go play outside, don't come back in unless there's blood or you need to use the bathroom." And in the winter, "go find something to do, or I'll give you work to do." Parents/other assorted family adults didn't really interact with kids unless it was to feed them, lay down the law, or punish them, and supervision was often, at most, a slightly older child/ren. I spent hours playing alone outside by 5. By 8, I was generally tasked with keeping an eye on my younger siblings while we stayed out of the adult's hair.

Now I'm a parent, and my kids(6, 3) go unsupervised for a couple minutes, at most, and I stress out about THAT. And they want me to play with them 24/7, even over fellow kids. I try my best, but I feel confused and frustrated a good 70% of the time. I have no frame of reference for this, kids who expect and want their parents around, and I forgot how to play years ago. I try to split it 50/50. I play with them for a bit, then make them go practice entertaining themselves for a bit.

Being a parent can really feel like a damned if you do, damned if you don't game a lot of the time.

hdevprogrammer
10
1 week ago

Helicopter parents give their kids little freedom at all then when they're older complain about "weak millennials won't grow up!"

facetiae_uvidae
8
1 week ago

Those helicopter parents mostly are millennials.

Aukos
8
1 week ago
InedibleSolutions
3
1 week ago

I was threatened with eviction. Kids really can't be kids anymore, and it's the same pearl-clutching generation calling us out that calls the cops when we do what they suggest.

Charles_Stover
3
1 week ago

A professor of mine had CPS called on her for letting her kids play in the rain. They said the kids would get sick. She said she better not let them shower anymore then.

brown_paper_bag
3
1 week ago

There was an article a few years back in Calgary where someone called CPS because the kids were playing in their fenced backyard while the mother was inside the house. People suck.

Icedbananabutts
2
1 week ago

That happened to me as well! We were all about 14/15 playing around outside my house. No alcohol or drugs, yet somebody called the cops on us. My mom couldn't stop laughing at how ridiculous that situation was.

rekipsj
677
1 week ago

This type of parenting had to stop because history tells us it leads children into the Upside Down and subjects us all to attacks from the demigorgons.

Kingkunta87
239
1 week ago

ƎW Ԁ˥ƎH

CringeNibba
106
1 week ago

Hello, my Australian friend

Tekknikal_G
35
1 week ago

¡3W d73H

Kingkunta87
52
1 week ago

ǝʇɐɯ ʎɐpפ

Stompedyourhousewith
3
1 week ago

FUCK YOU BARBARA! NO ONE LIKES YOU!

CajunTurkey
44
1 week ago

Upside Down

demigorgons

I'm not sending my kids to Australia.

Kaushik_Narayan
27
1 week ago

God I can't wait for S3

CesarTheSalad
2
1 week ago

I mean that same quarry also led children to IT so yeah it's definitely trouble

ded_a_chek
666
1 week ago

Some of my earliest memories are just wandering my neighborhoods. When I was 5 my mom had a 3-year-old and newborn twins to deal with so I just sort of did my own thing. I'd hit up the little stretch of woods down the street, walk to downtown and walk the main street. I was incredibly independent. By the time I was 9 I was regularly walking 6-10 miles a day, sometimes I'd walk to my grandpas house 3 miles away for the hell of it. Sometimes I'd walk the 5 miles to the beach at Lake Michigan and just spend the day on the dunes, my only meal for 6+ hours at a time a swiss cake roll I scrounged up the change to buy at the gas station.

I've tried to give some of that freedom to my kids as they grow up. Not the same, because my "freedom" was ridiculous, but some. Yet still I get nervous when my 12-year-old is out with his friends for several hours... but I think that's mostly because I remember what I was doing with my friends at 12.

Kaladindin
427
1 week ago

If your 12 yr old memories are anything like my 12 yr old memories, you probably should have died at least twice by that point with no one knowing about it except you and your friends.

AdorableCartoonist
310
1 week ago

Completely accurate.

"Hey lets fuck around on this train trussel!"

"Wanna shoot bow and arrows up in the air and try to dodge them"

"Dude I bet I can jump across this gap on my bike going downhill at 45mph"

Kids are fucking bouncy.

Kaladindin
103
1 week ago

We, uh, also shot arrows up into the sky... at night. We climbed up and down cliffs using a rope, if it broke or we slipped there was definitely some death coming.

Noyoucanthaveone
60
1 week ago

Omg I think about the climbing we used to do up in the mountains when I was younger with no adults or climbing gear for miles around. My daughter is 3 now and completely fearless. I’m going to have to pick up drinking or something to get through her teenage years. 😱

Kaladindin
18
1 week ago

Good luck out there.

Raivix
12
1 week ago

I grew up in a pretty old pine forest area. The number of 60+ foot tall trees I climbed when I was 8 is too damn high.

princestarshine
3
1 week ago

Bridge to Terabithia vibes

Kaladindin
3
1 week ago

STORY TIME
So we were sledding in late winter, the area we chose was a ravine. Very steep walls that came down to a creek. This bad boy was frozen over and we had a fun time. One of my friends decided our spot was too slow so he moved a bit further to the side than us. Well this particular area came off a little hill into a very wide portion of the creek. He goes down hits the little hill and flies right onto the ice which must have been way thinner than the rest because he disappeared right under that ice. He immediately burst back up, luckily the creek was only like waist deep. But we threw him on a sled and hauled ass home, was only like a 5-10 minute walk back.

princestarshine
2
1 week ago

Damn

umlaut
25
1 week ago

We played a game called "Throw Rocks At Each Other Until You Give Up"

Basically, you stand 15' apart in a pile of rocks and throw rocks at each other until one of you gives up.

TheWanderingFish
7
1 week ago

In grade three we played a great game where you would fill the sandpit in front of the swings with sticks poking out of the ground like some kind of spike pit from a movie. Then we'd take turns jumping off the swing and over them adding some more each time. Looking back I'm shocked no one got hurt.

Teachers didn't say a word about it.

Fusselfuiletton
2
1 week ago

Sounds fun

campoanywhere
2
1 week ago

You know how you can flick a bottlecap? We used to do that with pennies, so the game was whoever could draw blood on the other persons knuckle with a point blank shot. Turn-based.

When that grew old the game became who could draw blood on their own knuckles first.

Not a dangerous game but a glimpse into the absurdity of bored teenagers trying to entertain themselves.

blubat26
21
1 week ago

Kids are basically just coked-up adults with fewer responsibilities.

Rhetoriker
8
1 week ago

Friend and I used to shoot arrows at each other with longbows from 50m away and barely dodge them...

owjim
3
1 week ago

One of my favorite bits by Dennis Leary is when he recounts playing William Tell with his older brother and gets shot in the head with an arrow.

My parents weren't crazy enough to get me a bow and arrow set but we did have lawn darts that we threw at each other.

TheBookofAll
4
1 week ago

We found a giant sand pit and decided it would be cool to try and burrow to the other side of this literal mountain of sand. A body length in the sand shifts a little and I'm pulled out by my legs by my brother and friend... As an adult I realize that I could've been very easily buried and suffocated. Scary.

cman811
2
1 week ago

"LETS HAVE A ROCK THROWING WAR!"

drawkbox
14
1 week ago

My cousin, me and friends built twine based structures a 50-100 feet up in tall trees. Basically run twine, to create structures, bring wood up to lay walk areas, flexible tree houses if you will. I'd be terrified of it today but it was a blast. We used to actually have sleep overs up there and sway in the wind!

We used to also take motorbikes into the mountains and were chased by bulls, almost bit by snakes, investigating the mountains and any caves/areas.

We also used to go to new housing developments in progress and throw dirt clods, build ramps and bike trails, build stuff out of the excess wood, and go through the in progress sewer systems. One time a bunch of older kids took us far into one of these in development sewer systems that was huge and dark (almost IT like), then they bailed with the lights up a part that only tall bigger kids could get to. We had to find our way out in the dark.

We used to ride our bikes miles and miles away.

"We used to wait" -- Arcade Fire

Kaladindin
2
1 week ago

Damn. Just. Damnnnnnnnnnnnnn.

nomad1c
8
1 week ago

my dad and his brothers used to blow things up in some abandoned field after school (trash cans and the like). i'm amazed they didn't get hurt

Kaladindin
2
1 week ago

My grandpa accidentally set off a blasting cap off and blew up near him and his brother. Tossed shrapnel everywhere and they got hurt but not seriously.

Nylund
2
1 week ago

Me and my friends were all the kids of engineers, scientists, chemists, etc.

between the ages of 10 and 12 we would regularly steal shit from our parents’ garages and make bombs and go blow things up.

Like, we’d grab bottles of sulphuric acid, ethanol, or whatever, and we’d read about how to mix things to make bomb. Like real hillbilly meth lab kinda stuff, but for bombs made by 11 year olds.

I remember we had a secret fort out in the woods and we made a pretty accurate balance scale out of cardboard and chopsticks and tape to measure chemicals that used pennies and nickels as the weights to measure out grams and what not.

Mostly we just blew up stuff out in the woods, like rotting trees, but we blew up a cement water fountain in a park once. A makeshift “missile” didn’t work as intended once and ended up catching someone’s deck on fire when it flew in an unexpected direction. But mostly is was just random shit in the woods. We liked to bring out our old toys and blow them up.

But somehow no one ever got seriously hurt and we never got caught. We did have a number of close calls though.

Anti_Socialite70
3
1 week ago

5 times between 9 and 13 y/o for me. All of which had to do with heights. (I live in NYC)

candylannnd
42
1 week ago

My son has that kind of freedom. Yesterday he brought home an injured bird. Today he went to the pub and said g'day to the bar flies. Sometimes he goes and scabs biccies off the elderly at the retirement home. He's a lucky lad.

HotelMeatStick
55
1 week ago

What does this mean in American?

UnsuspiciousGuy
41
1 week ago

his young lad picks scabs off old people, like those foot nibbling fish you see in videos

countthemiles08
8
1 week ago
earned_potential
3
1 week ago

If I was that lad, I'd just stick to getting drunk in the pub.

Welp907
18
1 week ago

Gets the elderly ar the retirement home to give him cookies.

blubat26
5
1 week ago

I fucking love British slang and still don't understand why Americans never adopted it.

BrainFellator
8
1 week ago

We probably did but our slang changes drastically every 10 years so we moved on

Hotemetoot
4
1 week ago

Americans have a lot of their own slang but we tend to notice less because it's way more prevalent in the media.

blubat26
2
1 week ago

Yeah, and American slang is unsatisfying shit.

earned_potential
2
1 week ago

Everything is tiny. My parents house has these tiny ass toilets and these tiny ass sinks. I feel like Elf in my parents house when I visit.

HelpImOutside
2
1 week ago

Yo seriously I was thinking about this the last time I visited my parents. I used to think my backyard was so huge, like I could wander around it for hours and find new and interesting things and completely isolated from the world. When I was there a few months ago I was amazed at how open to the neighborhood it was, so many neighbors could see right in and you could literally walk across the entire thing in like a minute. So weird.

MZ603
5
1 week ago

I grew up in a rural neighborhood and some of my favorite memories are wondering around in the woods with a machete and an ax and chopping down dead trees with my friends.

Hail_theButtonmasher
5
1 week ago

Man I wish I had some freedom like that. But even if I did, I doubt I would be able to use it. School takes too much time, it's not as fun wandering in the desert rather than a forest, there are no cheap activities within walking distance, and my friends wouldn't be able to join me.

God I am not happy with that.

LadybugTattoo
3
1 week ago

I think that’s a big problem with the kids today is that mentality. I was a kid in late ‘90s, early ‘00s, my brothers and I ran wild with our friends with no money whatsoever (our parents were off doing drugs or working but that’s neither here nor there). We climbed mountains and trees, swam in definitely not pristine lakes/rivers, built fires, caught bugs and frogs and whatever else, built forts, met other kids we’d play with for a day and then never again, and when we couldn’t find anything else to do beating the shit out of each other was always an option.

It wasn’t a question of “there’s nothing fun to do here, it’s more fun at x than y, we have no money” we just went outside with our friends and fucked around and made fun. We were bored a lot, but more often than not we found something to get in to. I cherish it looking back. You have to go FIND it, not sit at home and say it’s not out there.

Hail_theButtonmasher
3
1 week ago

Yeah but it's considerably more difficult when you and your friends don't live near each other, can't drive, and are surrounded by the desert.

Have I tried? Yes. Did it work out? No.

Macscotty1
4
1 week ago

Even if I wanted to give my kids in the future the same outdoor freedom I had, they probably wouldn't even be able to experience it.

When I was a kid my mother moved to a city that was just starting to develop. So there was tons of empty space and unique locations. Had a burned out orchard, a dirt lot that was just piles of dirt from trucks dumping that the kids would make into bike ramps. And mini ravines caused by erosion that we could get junk from behind a store that they threw out and make a secluded hangout.

Now all that stuff is gone and any place like that near me is usually gated off or is no trespassing land.

natebibaud
4
1 week ago

Oh man yeah, when I was 12 I would leave the house at 9 AM with a skateboard and like three dollars and wouldn’t come back until it was dark. My parents were at work they had no idea where I was all day. It was like the most normal thing in the world

IndependentG
2
1 week ago

In our early teens 13-15 yrs, we rode 4 wheelers up to Lake Whitney and back, around 20 miles 1 way. Ride a few miles to the abandon housing development and turned it into a BMX bike track from all the mounds of dirt left. Or a few miles the other way and ride our bikes to Lake Waco to fish or play golf at the public GC

WillyPdaBeast
2
1 week ago

Im 15 walking 6 miles home rn

25russianbear25
2
1 week ago

what about drifting on broken ice sheet pieces durring the winters?

i have no idea what my parents were thinking lol

reduces
2
1 week ago

Bruh walking a few miles to Lake Michigan was the life.

Khir
619
1 week ago

Any time I talk about stuff like this I get the usual response that "Well it's so much more dangerous for kids these days," and I have always been extremely skeptical of this claim. I know for a fact that crime has been on the downtrend for the past thirty years, but has the incidents of child-related crimes gone up? (kidnapping, idk child murders, etc). I just find it very hard to believe that a bunch of pedophiles have come out of the woodworks over the past couple years to just kidnap any wayward child they might happen upon.

WutangCMD
259
1 week ago

Yeah there is no evidence it's more dangerous for kids nowadays. But because we can check in it feels like if we don't we aren't doing everything we can to protect them.

SwenKa
107
1 week ago

Also, news spreads to areas that never would have gotten coverage of it before.

[deleted]
50
1 week ago

[deleted]

automongoose
18
1 week ago

The population has also like doubled in the last fifty years. The rates might be down but overall abduction instances could be still pretty high.

Phyltre
5
1 week ago

But they're not, the car ride is still more dangerous.

owjim
2
1 week ago

Its Facebook, my wife reads these 1 in a million horror stories that happened to kids and then becomes irrationally worried.

DoctorWaluigiTime
11
1 week ago

There's also not much evidence that "kids were free as a bird back then and are locked down tight these days."

Strict parents existed back then, and vice versa today.

DarkwingDuckHunt
8
1 week ago

But there's more strict parents now then in the past.

DoctorWaluigiTime
2
1 week ago

Citation needed.

hey-frankie
5
1 week ago

Sure. Just look at how there’s more fat kids today than the past. And they don’t get that way from playing outside all day. Instead, kids are handed an iPad and they play fornite all day or watch YouTube videos. The kids are fine with this because they think it’s normal to spend your whole Saturday indoors, when 20 years ago, being indoors was the worst form of punishment during my childhood. But since parents are all afraid that their kids will be kidnapped, they keep them indoors most of the time. Which results in them not getting enough exercise.

DarkwingDuckHunt
3
1 week ago

username checks out

Khir
55
1 week ago

Thanks for the data. This was the kind of stuff I was looking for.

I don't know how to square this with the current culture. I am getting around the age where I would probably want to have kids in the next five or so years. I would like to think that I am of the mind that I would let my kids just be kids and roam where they may with little supervision. However, it's starting to feel like I would be parentally shamed if not arrested if I did that. I am not sure where my rights as parents end and the overwhelming cultural forces begin.

Have milk carton children doomed us all?

DesperateSomewhere
37
1 week ago

there’s a pretty good book (now several years old) called A Culture of Fear. it breaks down topic by topic how our profit driven media needs our attention and gets it through frightening the ever loving shit out of you. while you’re busy being worried about being attacked by a shark in your driveway, the real dangers (economic, environmental, etc) go unreported because there’s no sexy video of them.

Khir
13
1 week ago

Thanks, I will have to check it out. I find the incongruency of it all to be pretty strange. Like, we worry about child kidnapping, kids getting hit by traffic, etc. all the time. But the real statistical danger for kids/teens is giving them their drivers license and letting them drive! That kills waaaay more teens than any unsupervised walk home from the park as a kid ever would. But we accept that risk as a part of life.

snarkinthebox
15
1 week ago

In Freakonomics, the authors prove that sending your kid to a friend's house that has a pool is far more dangerous than sending them to a house that has a gun. Yet… we're not afraid of the pool.

DesperateSomewhere
4
1 week ago

speak for yourself. just because i haven’t found the sliding panel that releases the shark into it yet doesn’t mean it’s not there.

UseCaseX
3
1 week ago

In fairness to pools, they're well worth the risk. Swimming is fun!

DarkwingDuckHunt
9
1 week ago

Ah I miss the

"This chemical in this common household product has been recalled for killing children, we'll tell you which one at 11"

tolandruth
3
1 week ago

Find out this one food if eaten can kill your entire family tune it at 11 to find out what it is. Bitch I just ate tell me now.

IndependentG
2
1 week ago

This is one of the main reasons I cut the cable cord, also that fact it was as much as my motorcycle payment every month, so I cut the cable and bought a motorcycle. Ain't a 4k TV that can compare with seeing the Texas Hill Country in person on an iron horse.

Jimmy-McBawbag
3
1 week ago

As a parent of 2 boys (8 & 10) I can tell you that there probably will be people who try to tell you that if you're not supervising your kids every move the you're not doing it right.

They are wrong, sure you should generally know where they are (mine are currently playing in the park near our house because it's actually sunny here for a change) but giving them some freedom and responsibilitiy is good for them.

There are kids that live nearby by to us that are in my kids classes at school that I've never seen out playing with the other kids in the neighborhood because their parents are overprotective. I feel really sorry for them and question how they will become functioning adults when they grown uo

Recognizant
2
1 week ago

Factfulness: Ten Reasons We're Wrong About the World, and Why Things Are Better Than You Think

We're really, really bad at picking this sort of thing up anecdotally. Things are... surprisingly good right now, all things considered. They can always be better, but the last sixty years or so have been pretty amazing on average world-wide.

Eleventeen-
18
1 week ago

But are they lower BECAUSE kids have much less freedom I ways that could put them at risk for kidnapping? Or some other reason

throwhfhsjsubendaway
15
1 week ago

I also wonder if allowing your kids more freedom these days might put them at greater risk of being targeted than back when everyone did it.

Like if all of your neighbors got anti-theft systems and put stickers in their windows, but you didn't. You, personally, are at a greater risk of being burgled even if the overall crime rate goes down since you're now the easiest target.

bro_before_ho
14
1 week ago

90% of child rapists are the parents or a relative, if anything the rates should go up.

InsignificantOcelot
3
1 week ago

There’s probably some validity to that, but I think it misses the main point, that there was never a significant risk to begin with. It’s solving a problem that never really existed.

The article addresses this a little bit (forgive my lack of formatting, on mobile):

“But couldn't it be the case that kids are less prone to terrible tragedies these days because concerned parents are keeping them locked up at home, and calling the cops whenever they see someone else's kid walking alone down the street? Probably not.

"It's hard to say that much of the decline [in mortality and abduction rates] comes from stricter parenting," said Bryan Caplan, an economist at George Mason University who's written about child safety statistics.

When it comes to child mortality, "crime and accidents were never that big of a deal to begin with," he said. And there are a lot of factors driving those trends downward -- better safety standards for cars and better pedestrian infrastructure, for instance. Declining rates of violent crime overall also likely play a role.”

DrelenScourgebane
2
1 week ago

But, could it be that the stats are low now because people dont let their kids roam around as much, thus lowering their chances of getting kidnapped or murdered?

LeCroissant1337
52
1 week ago

Isn't there a reason why movies set in the eighties nowadays have this trope of a missing child's photo printed on the side of a milk carton?

Goldeniccarus
28
1 week ago

Yeah the reason there is so much paranoia about protecting children now is that the 70s and 80s happened, and enough kids disappeared/turned up dead that parents started getting paranoid. This has continued to today, even though much of the US is safer now than it was back then.

TheIndianUser
17
1 week ago

24hr news media is also to blame. They only report on violent crimes because that's what catches attention. If the media only reports the bad stuff we get conditioned to believe all the bad stuff is happening.

XRayCatVsWoodenDoors
6
1 week ago

24hr news media is also to blame. They only report on violent crimes because that's what catches attention.

The audience is also to blame in that context. I mean I agree TV news isn't helping at all, but they're also providing what their audience wants.

Alberta_Fire
3
1 week ago

It makes sense, a lot of the parents now grew up in the shadow of the 80s when crime rates were at the peaks.

mybachhurts
5
1 week ago

But is the US safer now because parents got paranoid during the 70s and 80s, resulting in stricter supervision?

Fells
21
1 week ago

Stephen Pinker wrote an incredibly compelling tome on the subject called The Better Angels of our Nature that shows that crime and violence (as well as poverty, starvation, disease and warfare) has been doing nothing but falling drastically since WW2. It is safer today for kids to run around loose in the neighboorhood than it was when I was doing it a few decades ago, and even then it was already extremely safe.

HazelCheese
11
1 week ago

Is it also because people are more paranoid and there is less opportunity though?

Can't kidnap kids if parents keep eyes on them all the time.

Can't just nick some tools from the building sight if everything is heavily guarded all the time.

Can't get lost and die of exposure in a forest if you need permits and training to trek there.

Etc etc

We learned the lessons of the past and came up with systems to combat them.

don_rubio
4
1 week ago

I don't see why no one has mentioned this...Everyone being more protective of their children, regardless of whether it is reasonable, would surely lead to less child-related crimes, right?

TrolleybusIsReal
4
1 week ago

Is it also because people are more paranoid and there is less opportunity though?

It isn't just that though. Especially the US was a great place for criminals after WW2 as cars became widespread and affordable. 60s also changed a lot of cultural values. All of a sudden the US became this massive area where you could just drive around without anyone really being able to track you and people even thought of it as a positive life style. That's also why some many serial killers got away for such a long time. E.g. Ted Bundy really didn't do anything special, he basically just seemed like a normal person and would drive around in his car murdering people. It took the police forever to see the pattern. Also crime technologies were far behind, poor data collection, no digital data and no sharing, no video cameras (or at least very rare), no DNA analysis, no mobile phones and everyone paid in cash...

HazelCheese
2
1 week ago

Yep. There is that serial killer Ed Kemper who called the police and confessed because he lost his motivation for killing people and it was getting stressful, and they didn't believe him. Despite the fact that everyone was aware there was a serial killer around. They were literally telling college students not to accept rides from strangers because of this. And the police just shrugged it off.

He had to call back later and talk to a different officer just to get them to go round his house and find the bodies.

Policing is a lot better these days, at least in that aspect.

Lovecraftenberg
2
1 week ago

Could also be because there's less lead in everyone's brains.

joking_around
11
1 week ago

I think it's because we have information access to every hecking murder/kidnapping/banal crime happening in the world. Always 24/7 and so it appears that there is a rise of crime. Back then you had your TV news and a newspaper with the most relevant stuff. And that's it.

firelock_ny
3
1 week ago

Exactly this. When I was growing up there could have been a cannibal cult eating children the next town over and the parents of my town wouldn't have known about it. "Hey kids, the streetlights are still on - why are you home?"

goblinmarketeer
5
1 week ago

I was a kid through the 80s and very few of us ever got kidnapped or murdered.

teddyKGB-
2
1 week ago

There's a theory that I believe that contributes crime going down in the early 90s to the lead act of 1974(?). It's pretty interesting.

scrappykitty
2
1 week ago

There was a huge article on that in Mother Jones. Very compelling.

angelpuncher
285
1 week ago

Spot on. It's OUR fault, you know. I don't know how a generation that was raised like free range cattle turned so over protective. Of all of my friends I had, by far, the least parental structure, and am now, by far, the most over protective of my kids. What's wrong with me?

SolidSpruceTop
148
1 week ago

The media is fear mongering so you see every awful thing that can happen happen while in reality theres a risk to literally everything and you just have to go with it. Kids are dumb but also really smart in ways, most will pull out the ol human survival instincts and have fun.

1mikeg
47
1 week ago

The other way to say this is that you don't have the critical thinking skills to counter act over-saturation from "the media". Everyone wants to play the mass media like some big boogie man, but in reality they're simply giving us what we've asked for and nearly everyone is too busy/dim/depressed to stop and think for themselves.

Or turn it off for two goddamn minutes.

GiantJellyfishAttack
3
1 week ago

I mean. It's just a human thing to be influenced by these things. Critical thinking or not. Fear mongering is going to get to worried parents. It's why cable news is still going imo. It's why Coke spends millions on commercials that are nothing more than "look at these happy people drinking our product. Wow they are so happy". Critical think about that commerical as much as you want, it still effects us though.

Reddit is no different. I would bet almost everyone on Reddit believes some liberal type stuff that they haven't even really though about or applied to their own life. Because they just see some headline and it kinda makes sense and no one has time to really do research and think it through. And I'm no exception either.

TwilightVulpine
2
1 week ago

I don't remember asking for a continuous flood of violence, crime and accidents. Truth is, this goes much deeper. We are hardwired as animals to pay more attention to possible threats, even the most rational people are susceptible to that. We do that despite ourselves.

Merry_dol
14
1 week ago

Yeah. Fear sells, and news media is happy to sell us fear over our children since it's something even people without children feel. We begin to see dangers every where because that's what we're being sold, and one of the insidious things about fear is that it doesn't have to be justified to be real enough to act upon. So, despite the fact that in so many ways the children of today face fewer risks than, say, when I was a kid (roads are generally safer, public places are usually covered by CCTV, practical things like that), it feels a lot worse. It's the cheapest, lowest kind of manipulation.

YeastInVagMakesBread
2
1 week ago

Im more scared of the cops getting called on me than I am of what the media is telling me.

stealnova
54
1 week ago

Let your kids be independent bro or your really gonna screw them up

moveitadro
21
1 week ago

YES! I have an aunt and uncle who were overprotective. My cousins from that family are not functional adults.

centurese
6
1 week ago

Agreed. My parents were super overprotective and now, at almost 20 years old, have crippling anxiety when asking my father to go anywhere, when I’m out past nine pm, or when I don’t answer his text message in half a second.

Just... realize being overprotective can really mess with your child’s self esteem and give them anxiety. I wish I had had the ability to be more independent - my parents give way more freedom to my little sister at 16 and she’s doing much better than me socially and mentally.

iamafascist
6
1 week ago

Is there any way you can sit down with them and talk about this? A 20 year old shouldn’t have a 9pm curfew.

centurese
4
1 week ago

Oh, I don’t have a curfew. But being out past 9 gives me crippling anxiety that I’ll return home to an angry father... which I never do. Realistically I know he doesn’t care anymore because I’m almost 20, but it’s hard to break habits like that.

hdevprogrammer
14
1 week ago

You're falling into fear mongering from the media. Don't raise your kids in a bubble, you want them to be ready for when you release them. They wont be protected by you forever

nikoskio2
7
1 week ago

You're protective because you know what kinds of stupid things kids get up to when they're left to their own devices

dhastings
3
1 week ago

So true. My friends and I should have died so many times...

TrolleybusIsReal
5
1 week ago

People are saying it's the media and it's probably true but it's also that the situation is different. E.g. mobile phones simply didn't exist and you couldn't just order everything online. So most parents wouldn't want to actively watch their children all the time to be able to do other stuff. The alternative would have been to basically lock the children in the house but children can get really annoying. So I guess "let them play outside" was just the best option to give you time for other stuff.

But now it's basically every control freak's wet dream where you can use apps to track children, see the history of everything they did, e.g. google tracks wherever you went.

veryblanduser
202
1 week ago

Yep, getting all the bad news stories nationally at your fingertips instead of only the ones that happened in close proximity to you. Makes you think danger is much more real than it is.

joking_around
30
1 week ago

Wow I just wrote that before reading your comment haha. I agree

DerpSenpai
16
1 week ago

not just nationally but sometimes world-wide. that's the big difference

For me, European, i see news 24/7 of incidents in Asia,US, rest of Europe...

NotActuallyOffensive
3
1 week ago

Society just kinda needs to accept tiny chances of something awful happening.

We shouldn't change laws and social norms because of isolated incidents.

Some kid gets murdered? Well that sucks, but a million kids didn't get murdered, so are we gonna keep all kids under lock and key with constant supervision from now on and destroy childhood for future generations because of it? Apparantly yes.

There are over 300 million people in the US. Bad shit is gonna happen to a few of them. Move the fuck on. The odds that your kid gets kidnapped or something is almost zero. Let them have a childhood.

toxicrx
174
1 week ago

Just had to be home before the street lights came on

My_Wednesday_Account
84
1 week ago

Which is a completely ass policy because the fucking street lights come on at like fucking 430 for half the year and 9 for the other half.

Raivix
33
1 week ago

Never really bothered me too much. My group of friends were usually doing shit that you wanted it to be light for anyways (baseball, riding bikes on trails, hiking in the woods, etc). Plus dinner was around 5 - 6 anyways.

My_Wednesday_Account
27
1 week ago

Oh see that's the difference.

I was a little shit growing up so the sun was my enemy. Starting fires and smoking weed is lame at 3 in the afternoon.

TAU_doesnt_equal_2PI
14
1 week ago

Starting to see why your parents wanted you home earlier...

deedlede2222
3
1 week ago

Man I burned shit all day haha

My_Wednesday_Account
2
1 week ago

Almost burned a house down when I was like 14. Friends burned down an abandoned barn. Somehow never received any serious burns.

Used to be such a shit.

deedlede2222
2
1 week ago

I ruined my hearing a bit with firecrackers and other explosives when I was a kid haha. put a nail in the coffin with club music and guns without ear protection

PhotoMod
2
1 week ago

Mine was I’d better be home 10 minutes after the street lights came on. Most of the kids in the neighborhood had to have had a similar policy. It was a mad dash of kids on bikes trying to get home before then. The perk to my parents is that they were drinking with the neighbors a lot, so I usually got a few extra minutes.

ZeiZaoLS
2
1 week ago

I had a similar policy even when we lived in Alaska, the sun was going down around midnight-ish in the summer so I basically just had free reign to ride my bike around being a hooligan for 20 hours a day.

FormerlyKnownAsCool
93
1 week ago

Nobody:

Facebook Reddit: Things were better when we were kids

[deleted]
35
1 week ago

[deleted]

FormerlyKnownAsCool
12
1 week ago

i'll have you know i'm a xennenial you age-shamer

stumblebreak_beta
21
1 week ago

Am I the only one who thinks 80-90% of the stuff people say about their childhood is bullshit? Like I have an old friend who post the “back in my dad” stuff like this, and when we hung out as kids we’d mostly go to the gas station .25-.5 miles down the street and chill in our basements playing video games.wed make bike ramps in our driveways and one friend had a treehouse in their backyard but we were always within war shot of a parent. If we ever went more than a mile or 2 away from our neighborhood we’d get driven their and were really only left unsupervised once we were 12-13 range.

I’d probably guess kids are coddled more these days but hearing people’s stories most kids in the 90s spent every single day going through the equivalent of seal team six survival trainings. There’s a comment in this thread about hopping on trains and jumping off 80 foot bridges!

iamafascist
8
1 week ago

I don’t know, maybe your friend group wasn’t particularly adventurous. Not saying that’s a bad thing, just my experiences as a kid were pretty wild so I believe these other stories. Certainly, however, MOST of the kids in my neighborhood probably didn’t get up to nearly as many shenanigans as my friends and me. Our group’s parents left us unsupervised since we were like 7 or 8 years old. If we had been supervised until we were 12, I doubt I’d have as many crazy stories.

FormerlyKnownAsCool
2
1 week ago

I'm just not sure why there seems to be a lack of awareness that EVERY generation romanticizes their own youth. The best music obviously came from when YOU were a teenager. YOU had more freedom... etc etc...

Dissentient
2
1 week ago

I'm a millennial. Not exactly the same thing, but back when I was a kid, I had an unrestricted and unmonitored access to the internet. I pirated and played M-rated games, movies, downloaded porn, etc. So did everyone else I knew.

When I look at current parents, I only see helicopters that monitor all communication of their children, throw tantrums whenever a child looks at anything they don't approve, and don't let them out of the house without a GPS tracker.

To me it's obvious that current parents are more controlling than previous generation. Not sure if it's mostly due to the difference in mindset, or the availability of surveillance tools.

newagesewage
2
1 week ago

"back in my dad... we were always within war shot of a parent"

Okay, upvoted for typos! (personally unprecedented ;])

El_Maltos_Username
13
1 week ago

But only 90s kids remember that.

Benas360
6
1 week ago

He didn't really say it was better, he just made a point of how different it is now. Get over yourself

FormerlyKnownAsCool
4
1 week ago

every generation romanticizes their own youth. <meme> is this gatekeeping </meme>

sshhtripper
75
1 week ago

As a woman that grew up with two older brothers in the 90s, my experience was that my brothers received the latter treatment while I was subject to the former all the time.

My brothers did whatever they wanted. I had to tell my parents where I was going, call when I got there, had a curfew, and to make sure I had a plan for getting home before I even went out.

This was the sole reason I applied to college far away that forced me to move out. Just a suggestion to parents, try not to be too overbearing, kids will rebel.

hargeOnChargers
11
1 week ago

I wonder if it had anything to do with gender

UnsuspiciousGuy
31
1 week ago

For you yankees out there, ford escorts is slang for immolated prostitutes during the salem witch trials

newagesewage
2
1 week ago

Think you're conflating them with the fjord escorts... Viking ladies of the evening that couldn't quite make it on the Bifröst.

cardiovascularity
2
1 week ago

I also lived near a quarry. Spent quite a few evenings and weekends there trying (and succeeding) to find fossils.

mtntrail
15
1 week ago

Exactly, raised in the ‘50’s, in the group of guys there was an order, leader on down. Once in a while someone fought, but we were all friends and eventually everything was good. But those moments of conflict were tests and builders of personality and sense of self, and judgement. Once in a while most everyone got pummeled by the local bully, but it was expected and accepted, you avoid him, no big deal. Everyone knew he was just a looser and would end up in prison, which he did, btw. The conflict and independant resolution required was a normal part of growing up.

earned_potential
6
1 week ago

I'm convinced there's something innate in us to be this way, and it plays a proper and necessary role in our society.

Similarly, when I was growing up, fighting wasn't a big deal. There was a social pecking order, and if anything I think it challenged me personally and helped me find my way. In fact, I'm grateful it was there and what it taught me, and the last thing I would have wanted was to be "protected" from it.

mtntrail
2
1 week ago

I agree completely that alternatives to physical fighting need to be taught by parents, as mine did. They never knew about the scuffles that we got into around the neighborhood. It was most certainly a different era 60 years ago but the occasional wrestling, or even fistfight was not seen as any big deal. Rough and tumble play with guys was just that. Everyone got through it and were pals again the next day. It wasn’t seen as behavior that led to a life of violence. The actual bullies at school were a different matter.

Shawnj2
6
1 week ago

It’s better to teach children that fighting is bad and to settle their differences in another way, especially between friends, though.

Seanspeed
3
1 week ago

Seriously. Fighting happens, but to just act like it's all ok and to just let them do it is nonsense. That's how you get people who grow up as adults who think that violence is somehow a 'solution' to problems and anger.

I had my share of fights as a kid, but at no point did my parents do anything but scold me for doing so and I'm glad they did. Would not have wanted to grow up thinking it was acceptable behavior.

editorss
2
1 week ago

That may be - but kids are also fucking brutalizing each other these days. Every middle or high schooler seems to either idolize MMA fighters, or are actively taking MMA classes and looking for an excuse to beat someone to death.

Look at /r/fightporn - the level of beat downs these days among your average middle and high schooler seems way more vicious than when I was in middle school

sunshineonmypussy
57
1 week ago

24 year old here who was raised with overprotective, sheltering parenting style. I was never given the chance to fail, so now every failure is world shattering and I don’t know how to cope with it.

I wasn’t allowed to go to normal hangouts/parties without them meeting the parents first. This killed my social life, especially in high school. I still really struggle making meaningful connections with people and I don’t really have any friends to this day.

Alarms were installed so we couldn’t sneak out, this prevented me from having any ounce of freedom.

My phone was tracked and my location was known 24/7, not that I could go anywhere without asking anyways.

I was constantly accused of smoking. Wore too much perfume? “You must have been trying to hide the smoke smell” and this was because my mom smoked at age 13.

Kept having makeup privileges taken away, and not allowed to dye my hair or any real form of self expression.

My phone had to charge in my parent’s room at night and they would read the texts, if anything didn’t add up like messages were deleted then my phone was taken. Do you know how humiliating it is to be going through raging puberty hormones and being questioned why your texts to your crush seem like some were deleted and having to explain (lie) what they said? and having your phone taken away if you’re not adept at lying, while panicking that they will text something inappropriate while my phone was in their possession.

I later found out my mom had installed spyware on the family computer and had read everything I’d ever typed on it. Which was horrifying. Everything I said was monitored and I was barely allowed to leave.

Both me and my sister have pretty significant anxiety and depression. We don’t know how to be self sufficient adults and run to our parents when anything goes wrong still to this day. Don’t get me wrong, my parents are great people and we have a wonderful relationship now, but god damn I’d be lying if I said I couldn’t trace every overprotective practice to a specific problem I face today.

bumbuff
30
1 week ago

I'd argue you were mentally abused growing up with all that.

sunshineonmypussy
5
1 week ago

Well those are just the negatives. Despite my anger from the overprotection (and boy did I lash out often as a teen- but who could blame me?) I always felt loved. My mom was abused sexually and mentally as a child by her stepfather, and when she told her mother she said “well do you want us to leave and be on the streets?” And continued to stay with the disgusting man until a he died a few years ago. No doubt that would fuck up any child.

so I understand where the trust issues and overprotectiveness came from. They’re people as well and I get that all these things were because they wanted to protect us. I really truly do. It’s just not a good way to parent. They had good intentions, but their good intentions just happened to have negative effects. I do not plan to have any children because of this. I don’t know the balance. Being a parent seems hard as hell and people who don’t even have themselves figured out fully should not be in charge of forming another life.

And that’s the end of my Wednesday rant!

juiciofinal
2
1 week ago

Your situation is really similar to mine. My parents loved me, and had bad experiences in their childhood resulting in a very strict parentying style. I know all they wanted to do was protect me and my sisters, but they unknowingly caused a lot of problems. I'm definitely not having kids.

BlueSabere
5
1 week ago

Nope, definitely not mental abuse. Pretty much the same thing happened with me, minus the perfume/smoking accusations because I’m male. I was scared to do anything that I couldn’t 100% hide from my parents, for fear of them taking what privileges I did have. Didn’t and really still don’t have a social life outside of people I normally interact with daily, because I was essentially trapped in my house when I wasn’t at school. Parents definitely loved me, and I was given a lot of free time, but it was really just restricted to games, TV, and reading, because anything else required me leaving the house. Was in no way abuse, just overprotectiveness.

ValerieCvF
3
1 week ago

Wow, that is next level coddling. Thank you for sharing.

I got pretty much the contrary. They said no to stuff, but mostly did not care at all what we (me and my sister) did.

I was lucky to have grand-parents and aunts nearby that provided the security and self-worth I needed. But I really do think a bit of overprotection would have shown they cared, and would have prevented several serious family issues.

While we are self-sufficient, me and my sister also suffer from pretty bad anxiety et she from depression.

Kids really do need a happy medium.

Afeazo
2
1 week ago

This is not strict or over protective parenting, this is strait up child abuse.

Inshabel
52
1 week ago

I climbed on top of a schoolbuilding and jumped into the sandbox a couple times.

That's great honey.

Jeff_Johnson
4
1 week ago

As kids we climbed on fortress in our town. I still have nightmares from it.

randomevenings
44
1 week ago

I loved growing up in the 80s and 90s. When I was a kid, maybe 5 or 6, I would just walk to one of the neighbors. They were nice old ladies that would give me candy and make me toast. My parents would call around and find where I was, or they would call and let them know I was there. Then when I was older, me and all the kids from the neighborhood would play outside all summer, or go to one of our houses to play video games, build legos, that kind of stuff. Sometimes we would play sports, ride our bikes around wherever, dig holes, burn random objects, so long as we were home when the sun was going down, so long as we said where we were going before we left. Then in highschool, I got an old shitty car and would cruise around, I had to pick my sister up from school and she and like 6 other people would pile in and the car would barely get going. I would go on dates, or hang out with friends until late at night. I had a couple girlfriends and my dad let us be in my room with the door closed. I would stay up late at home on the PC making music, jerking off, or playing games. If you made good grades, my parents just let it go. I worked summers and the last two years of highschool, so I left at noon. I had built up enough credits to do that. Having money at 16, 17, 18 was awesome. The weekends were a blast, although few places were open to us, we found stuff to do out in the undeveloped areas west of town. Taking LSD and ecstacy, smoking some weed, hanging out.

Everything changed after 9/11. I had graduated in 2000. My sister was still in school then. Everything changed overnight. America was suddenly scared of it's own shadow.

outofthewaaypeck
13
1 week ago

We're the same age. I think our class (late gen x/very early millennial) had it great. Innocence of the 80s and then old enough to fully embrace all the cool 90s stuff as well. Everything about life changed my sophomore year of college.

randomevenings
3
1 week ago

Yeah it was really crazy. And it was sad. That time was one where if you spent much time on the web, and you had some brain cells, there was a solid chance you knew more about current events than the majority of America. If someone got their news from TV, you knew more than they did about what was happening. It was a reality distortion field. At the time, it was crazy witnessing America vote away it's freedoms one after the other. It was crazy seeing us bomb places that had little to do with the attack, and we let saudi arabia go. Then in 2003, we decided to go to war with iraq "just because". Then coincidentally, also in 2003, we withdrew all our troops stationed in saudi arabia.

If you were on the internet back then you also knew Israel had some kind of involvement, but there was no telling what. Just that they appeared to know the attack was coming.

Later, a bunch of diplomatic cables were leaked showing Israel and the saudis communicated with each other often on the back channel, and without antagonism. This implied that their public sabre rattling was for show.

Anyway, I'm getting off topic, but the internet was pretty great before it was co-opted by big business and inundated with propaganda like television had been. You had to be alive and a certain age at that time. It seemed everyone in my peer group was on the same page, and it was a completely different page than anyone from the boomer generation. Also, we were, in a way, living in the future already. We were pirating music and movies since we were teens, and we were early adopters of 802.11b. We didn't have smart phones, but we had laptops and similar apps and software. Myspace was great and you could be whoever you wanted to be. Myspace also became a place where new music was discovered. My city was the number one place for cell phone adoption in the 90s and early 00s. Everyone had one, and we are a car centric, very city spread out, so we were mobile and connected. So we experienced the phenomenon of having to stay connected earlier than elsewhere. My dad would get mad if i didn't answer my cell, or my sister. This was late 90s. I had a nice digital camera I bought with my job money in 2000. It was 3.1mp and had a good sensor for indoor photography, also lens attachments. I have been taking digital pictures since I was 18 years old, and I'm 37. I would digitize my art with a camera instead of a scanner, and fuck with it in photoshop. I had my own 2 bedroom apartment at 20. And DSL internet. I could afford that with my job that became full time after I graduated highschool. That was 2002. I also had my own online radio station, and made music. The apartment was such a cool thing, it was so easy to meet girls on the internet back then. In 2004, secondlife became a thing. It's odd to imagine that in 2004, we had an online virtual world where one could do pretty much anything, with areas completely uncensored. Strange creatures talking with aliens and people, vitual dance clubs, 3d art, and scripted games and automation. It was ready player one, but a long time ago. It had it's own scripting language, economy, exchange rate with USD. Someone made a real life million bucks selling virtual land in the first few years. Then also in 2004, nobody my age could understand why bush was re-elected. But it was the reality distortion field of being privileged to know more than almost everyone else about what was happening in the world.

Even post 9/11, before the financial collapse, the world was very different than it was today, but if you were my age, and connected, today doesn't feel so different than those days. The computers are smaller, and everything is more expensive, and I don't carry a laptop, phone, and a separate camera, music player, but the function of those devices and my pixel isn't so much different, and so my life is not drastically different in the smartphone age. Facebook is a shadow of how cool myspace was, but instagram beats flickr for sharing photos. I don't have an SD card full of MP3s and a SANSA. I have google play music. But the mobility hasn't changed. Google maps was, for me, the killer app, because it was real time. It beats planning trips with mapquest, but in some ways, again, it's not that different. I remember my social life in 2002 and how things are now, and I was really living in the future then, and things have just caught up to expectation recently.

One thing I miss, besides a more free internet less filled with fake news, is that I can't gift music anymore.

EDIT: I didn't mean to write so much, but thinking about things made me realize how little we have actually advanced. We have basically created the tech we all knew was possible then, and we allowed the internet to become a tool for propaganda and corporate greed like TV. We have successfully given this future to many more people in the world, but for me not all that much is different, in some ways it's harder to do things like online date, when it was SO EASY back then (glad I met someone before tindr reached critical mass). Also, creativity isn't really cultivated like it was. Myspace allowed you to do so many things, and became a hub of music and art, facebook is just blue and boring. Livejournal was fun, too, and all the flash games, and youtube before the corporate takeover. We had uncensored virtual worlds and people dived into world of warcraft for an unforgettable adventure. I'd argue the financial crisis changed the world more than 9/11. It allowed the rich to buy up the rest of everything. All products, media, everything. Companies don't develop products now, they try to get bought by a tech monopoly. Your house was taken from you and rented back to you. Your productivity is given to a bank now. All those insane 40 year olds are even more insane 60 year olds that post on social media.

pepperland24
3
1 week ago

I really appreciate that you took the time to type this out. I have siblings that graduated from high school in 1999 and 2001 while I graduated in 2011. Our experiences growing up were so different but I think you really hit the nail on the head. My siblings became adults in an incredible tech boom and the geopolitical realm was relatively stable. They were generally left to do whatever they wanted with little to no oversight. Conversely, one of my first "political memories" (besides 9/11 and GORE-ida) was the PATRIOT Act passing around the time I turned 9. I've just lived my life with big brother watching while my siblings were able to adjust to it.

randomevenings
3
1 week ago

Man 2011 was a bad time to graduate anywhere in the country except for a few places and few careers. I hope you have done OK since then. From where I was standing, I was doing well in 2011 because I'm in the oil and gas industry. I fondly remember pop culture and music from that time, and wish occupy wasn't trashed like it was in the mainstream media. I was really behind the people out during Occupy, but I had to keep it on the DL because I was surrounded by right wingers and old boomers as a casualty of being in Texas and in the O&G biz. It was also evidence that the internet had by then been co-opted by the same groups that owned traditional media, although like today, if you know where to look, you can get the real story. I worry about more and more people growing up and not realizing there is a "real story" out there to seek. I have young nephews, and they kind of accept things as they are presented to them and don't ask too many questions. I see that a lot in Gen Z. The oldest of Gen Z resent people my age for not doing enough for them. We went all in on identity politics, but never reduced the cost of living, never ended the drug war, or reduced the prison population, or managed to stop Trumpism.

Anyway, we tried, but nothing short of total revolution will change those things. We are the most productive generation ever. And the most underpaid. Social justice was still a worthy cause in such an environment.

outofthewaaypeck
2
1 week ago

If you were on the internet back then you also knew Israel had some kind of involvement, but there was no telling what. Just that they appeared to know the attack was coming.

woahoo, careful there, lad. genpop has not been conditioned to accept these truths regarding our greatest ally.

I agree that life was better and more real and pure before all of this. Tech companies, not technology in and of itself, has polluted and distorted everything.

randomevenings
3
1 week ago

I mean, I think people are getting pissed that we selling weapons to Saudis, and also more and more public statements coming out of Israel are being heard by westerners and those statements are disgusting and racist. Many people are questioning our support, or at least contextualizing American foreign policy better today, in that we clearly are helping to prop up these two somewhat stable regimes in the region, because their collapse would cause such a disastrous power vacuum in the world's most contentious area. That power vacuum would be immediately capitalized on by our biggest adversaries as far as this globe sized chess game goes, russia, china.

That said, They aren't our friends. Not Israel, and especially not the Saudis. Bush family friends maybe, but not America's friends. We tolerate them because of what it would mean should they collapse. We might not lose much, but adversaries would gain much. Also we are closely aligned (NATO Allies) with countries nearer that region, and so they, through us, also expect us to continue support, for what it would mean for them if we didn't.

outofthewaaypeck
2
1 week ago

That said, They aren't our friends. Not Israel, and especially not the Saudis. Bush family friends maybe, but not America's friends. We tolerate them because of what it would mean should they collapse.

couldn't have put it better myself. they need us. we don't need them and that goes for the entire world. we have vast natural resources, human capital, and the best military. We play nice but we could be mean. China cannot compete except by pure numbers of people that are disposable to the gov ruling them.

correcthorsereader
6
1 week ago

Good Bot!

marin358
14
1 week ago

who tf eats dinner at 5?

1mikeg
16
1 week ago

A stereotypical 50's nuclear family where the mom is at home all the day and the dad leaves work at 4:45 to tackle his ten minute commute. Dinner's on the table by the time he comes through the front door or there'll be hell to pay.

mtntrail
6
1 week ago

Well I am an old fart, but when my dad got home from work, dinner had better damn well be on the table or very close. That was in the ‘50’s and 60’s. Watch the dinner scene in”A Christmas Story” for the sad details.

undercooked_lasagna
6
1 week ago

I eat dinner at 5 every day. That's when I get home from work and I'm always ravenous when I walk in the door.

h8j
3
1 week ago

Can't believe I had to scroll so far down to see someone ask this.

woohoo
15
1 week ago

Survival Bias.

You don't hear about the unsupervised kids who died because they don't have 4G in heaven

Fat_Phil_Cares
10
1 week ago

Ain't that the truth. Family pets are now monitered more closely than children were back in the day.

1mikeg
6
1 week ago

That's kind of a good thing though. Growing up in a fairly rural area, I saw way too many strays dead on the side of the road. Like, every fucking day, it was either another dead dog or cat.

corb3939
11
1 week ago

That’s pretty early for dinner.

maz-o
2
1 week ago

pretty normal in many places

brazilliandanny
2
1 week ago

Don't most people work till 5?

1mikeg
3
1 week ago

Yes. Once again proving that nostalgia is mostly bullshit.

maz-o
2
1 week ago

I didn’t say most places

demlet
13
1 week ago

I see these comments everywhere and yet almost no parents I know actually give their kids the freedom they lament them lacking, and judge me for giving it to my own child. Strange world.

juiciofinal
2
1 week ago

Yep. If you miss the good ole days tha much, why not let your kids have good ole days as well.

ChelSection
2
1 week ago

Exactly this. You don't get to complain about how the kids you raised turned out if you're not gonna take a little responsibility. I see it a lot with kids & screen time now - who bought a 3 year old an iPad? who bought a 8 year old a smartphone? Look in the mirror ffs

200lbRockLobster
12
1 week ago

I'm surprised i'm even still alive with all the freedom I had back in the 90s. 11 year old me use to hop on the train that ran through our town everyday. One time I stayed on a little too long and then jumped off half way over the train bridge that went over the river with atleast an 80 foot fall. Had about 3 feet of wood to chill on til the train passed and I could walk back.

ImStillaPrick
7
1 week ago

As soon as the sun was up it was free game til the street lights went on and the rule was pretty much not to cross any highways. Things in between the highways included woods on private property and a nasty ass creek that I am surprised none of us drowned in and railroad tracks where hobos lived and my friends and I used to jump on and off moving trains for fun.

Once my friends and I were like 2 miles away from home and decided to jump on a random trampoline in someone's yard. 20 minutes later a kid came out to tell us that his mom asked if we wanted any lemonade and then he came out and jumped with us too.

Sometimes we would pull the whole "spending the night with a friend" trick where all of us would say spending the night with a different friend but our parents wouldn't confirm and we would just run the streets til 1 am and camp in those people's private woods. Not a real tent either, we were in middle school camping in those play tents, mine was a He-Man one that I got out of my closet from when I was younger and my feet would stick out the bottom if I stretched out cause it was too small.

MEGnificent-me
9
1 week ago

I don’t know. With the spread of information, it’s so accessible for people to see how easily a life can be lost, no matter how safe you think a neighborhood is. In 2001, my brother,8, and his pack of friends, like 8 - 15 kids ages 6 - 12, would roam around our suburban neighborhood after school. One day, the pack was at the local elementary school two streets from our house. At dusk the kids started to return home, so my brother and his friend went to cross the street. It’s not a busy road but my brother and his friend fell behind and were trying to catch up, my brother crossed and his friend hesitated, and then decided to cross. Unfortunately, a car was coming and the driver, paying attention more to the the group of kids ahead and my brother who just crossed, didn’t see a small 8 year old boy dart in front of her car. She was going about the speed limit,25 mph, and the little boy was killed. The trauma from this event is indescribable and the ripple effect of grief and sadness permeates through the community in so many ways. It happened so easily, so randomly. I know no one will forget watching the look of a father who walks by the too-small casket of his only son. I may not go full smother mother with my children, but I’ll be damned if I don’t at least take precautions of a cell phone to avoid ever having to experience anything like this ever again.

ca4bbd171e2549ad9b8
17
1 week ago

That doesn't mean the proper response is to smother your children and take away all their freedom.

MEGnificent-me
3
1 week ago

I said that I would not smother my children. I would utilize tools available to me to monitor in what I feel is an appropriate way. It does mean that they won’t disappear into the neighborhood until dusk. It does mean that if they want to go to the school and play for a few hours I can arrange pick up and drop off. That’s not smothering, but some might see it as over cautious, I’d rather be over cautious then have to bury one of my children.

leparsdon
8
1 week ago

How would a cell phone prevent a child from being hit by a car?

MEGnificent-me
2
1 week ago

I would drop them off at the school to play and pick them up when they were ready to leave. The cell phone would allow for that communication so they aren’t wondering around the neighborhood.

CabbageCarl
8
1 week ago

Lots of us used to play outside with minimum supervision. However, almost all of us also have a story about “that one time that sketchy guy might’ve been trying to abduct us”

SomalianRoadBuilder
4
1 week ago

The “take your phone” part is 100% unnecessary. What’s she going to do, leave it at home? Lol

simondrawer
6
1 week ago

Two stories from my childhood to put this into perspective:

When I was five I wanted to walk to school with all the other kids in my neighbourhood. My mum said this was OK and every morning she took me over to a neighbour and then went to work at her new part time job. A bunch of us (ten or so) with ages from 5 to 7 all walked to school together with no adults. There was one big road to cross (actually not that big as I found out visiting as an adult) but the road had a lolly pop lady. She always said hello but I was 5 so didn’t realise for a good long while that it was my mum in a lolly pop lady uniform - she had got the job so she could keep an eye on me while giving me the feeling that I was responsible enough to get to school.

Around that time a friend had his birthday party and we went to see BMX bandits at the cinema. All our parents dropped us off with money in our pockets to buy popcorn and tickets to the movie. Years later my dad admitted that some of the parents sat through the movie a few rows back to make sure we were OK but without us realising.

Just because kids “back in the day” thought they had roam around the neighbourhood doesn’t mean their parents weren’t discretely checking up on them to make sure they were OK.

maz-o
6
1 week ago

are parents honestly asking their kids to text every 20 minutes !??!?

pelb
5
1 week ago

Anytime I hear about all those abducted children cases I always wonder why the fuck a 6 year old child walk home alone? Parents are over protective now but for good reason.

vurplesun
3
1 week ago

Plus, strength in numbers. There were more kids outside playing together, so it provided a little bit of group protection. I wouldn't let my kid wander around outside alone.

pelb
2
1 week ago

When I take my niece to the park I don't even feel comfortable letting her out of my eyesight.

ilkel
5
1 week ago

Reddit Remember when we were allowed to go out unsupervised when we were kids ?

Also reddit when a kid gets hurt or does something dumb while unsupervised But where were the parents ?

thehazardousseahorse
4
1 week ago

"don't be late or you don't eat"

Nylund
4
1 week ago

Growing up, the rule was “be home before dark.”

This is what made summers awesome. Us kids could just disappear into the woods for 12+ hours.

We’d trek off after breakfast and not come home till 9pm.

robata_
5
1 week ago

I used to ride down huge hills on my bike full speed no brakes, I'd go into the woods for hours looking for arrow heads, I would swim across the river to get to my friends house when I was just eight years old.

I had so much freedom and I hope to God I give my future kids some of that.

Driftedwarrior
5
1 week ago

Or the good old days of Mom Dad I'm going to spend the night at Scott's house, to them they thought we were playing video games or whatever. In reality we were at a party in a field literally dying from alcohol poisoning, trying to find where the fuck are clothes are. Good times good times.

simondrawer
3
1 week ago

Yet parents blame “kids these days” when it is their own more restrictive parenting strategies. I had to come home when the street lights came on and my kids will come home when the sun goes down (because no street lights here).

chernobyl-night-club
2
1 week ago

A lot of people today live in new suburbs. You can’t even cross the street without 3 ton SUV’s careening down the road. It’s scary even as an adult jogging around for exercise. Imagine being a kid on a bike. Plus everything is far away. I can’t send my kids to buy milk at the corner store like how I did when I was young.

I’m almost certain old neighborhoods still raise their kids the old fashion way. New neighborhoods are different. Plus the culture is different. Everyone puts their kids in taekwondo or soccer, etc. Not many kids roam the streets in cookie-cutter suburbs. There’s no sense of community any more.

caribou16
5
1 week ago

This is true, but I also wonder if it would have been the same for us if we were walking around with cell phones in our pockets? Up until I was 14 the only rule was "be home by dark" and after that it was "if you get arrested, we're not bailing you out"

MOMFOX
4
1 week ago

My husband at 12: mom we are going to ride our bikes 2 miles and swim in the Mississippi river. mom: if you drown I will kill you.

victorlp
4
1 week ago

I remember when I was younger (maybe 8) I rode the bicycle far from home on a abandoned road and my tire blew up. It took me hours to get home, and when I arrived my parents didn't noticed I was away for so long. That freedom was some good shit, I wish I could do that again.

Lotti_Codd
4
1 week ago

People basically decided that their upbringings were on a par with Oliver Twist and as such would be cool parents and let their kids do what they want and have what they want. This inherent self-loathing has led to a whole generation of fucked up kids who are allergic to everything and fat.

freddyeire
3
1 week ago

Diner at 5? You guys are insane

You go to sleep at midnight with empty stomach? Or worse: you go sleep with stomach full of unhealthy snacks that you had to eat from 5pm to 12am ? It is just insane.

lupuscapabilis
2
1 week ago

In my house we'd have dinner at 5 and then we'd have to make our own food after that. Unhealthy snacks? Hah, as if my mother would allow those in the house...

No, when you were a kid in my house you learned how to cook eggs or make something from a can in the closet if you wanted to eat after dinner.

james___uk
3
1 week ago

There's this great bit in Flight of the Navigator where the mum wants the older brother to watch the younger brother and he replies with something like 'he'll be fine mom, he's 9 years old!'

goblinmarketeer
5
1 week ago

I was a latch key kid from 7 years old on... meaning I got home from school, opened my own front door with a key and was unsupervised for many hours. It was very common among my peers. Now, this exact same behavior would cause a CPS investigation.

james___uk
2
1 week ago

Yeah it must still be commonplace, I don't really understand what else many parents can do if they can't leave their kids unsupervised at home

larchpharkus
3
1 week ago

I remember dinner at 5

AmpersandTheMonkey
5
1 week ago

This speaks to me on a spiritual level as a pre-internet 90s kid who is now a dad.

jaguarundi_
3
1 week ago

I used to be in trouble if I was in the house and it wasn’t dark outside.

Jandishhulk
3
1 week ago

How many miles did you walk to school in the snow?

insertfunnyshithere
3
1 week ago

Who tf eats dinner at 5?

Kaledis00
3
1 week ago

When I was a kid (born in '74), I would go out in the morning, be out all day and come home for dinner without fail. Parents had no clue where I was or what I had been up to. Never got into any trouble, we just used to play at the local park or the woods. This was from about ages 8 to around 13, I only stopped going out with the local kids as they all started smoking and I was getting more into gaming and computers.

Simpler times then.

Plus neighbours actually talked to each other, so they generally knew where we were anyway, usually by the noise we were making.

FuzzyAss
3
1 week ago

Me: I'm going over to Tommy's for a sleepover

Tommy: I'm going over to FuzzyAss' for a sleepover

Us: Heads to the hills to sleep in a cave

Mom's: Have fun

isaid-overeasy
3
1 week ago

Same.

In second grade, I would go out with my friends to this old drain pipe in the woods that went across a, like, 20ft drop off. We would scoot across this pipe to the other side and hang out at the apartments on that side, scoot back, and walk home.

We did this literally every day and I almost fell off so many times. There was a ton of rusty metal, old vacuum cleaners, wheelchairs, and garbage in the drop off and I almost fell off of the pipe about a thousand times but we did it anyway. I even told my parents about it and they were like 🤷

If my son told me that's what he was doing NOW, I'd never let him outside again. Idk what I was thinking when I did it but I definitely could have died.

sannehbalama
2
1 week ago

We restrict our kids because we realize kids do really stupid things. Like WTF were our parents thinking? Did they even like me?

isaid-overeasy
2
1 week ago

That's a topic for a different day. One of my parents DIDN'T like me...😂

But seriously, my son keeps trying to jump from higher and higher places. I would NEVER let him go out by himself somewhere (as young as I was when I went off alone). First thing he would try to do is jump in the gross mall fountain or something. 🤦

Mendetus
3
1 week ago

True story: Grandpa: Go play outside Kids:But there's a tornado watch Grandpa: Well go outside and watch it

josebolt
3
1 week ago

With out the good old days all the murder mystery media would be lacking in source material.

medfordjared
3
1 week ago

We're this way because we know what happened at the abandoned quarry.

curlyloca
2
1 week ago

Come home when the street lights come on.

HachikoLu
2
1 week ago

I used to go to overnight summer camp for two glorious weeks every summer. This was pre cell phone days so they only way they heard from me was by letter. Phone calls were not allowed unless in case of extreme emergency.

xycochild
2
1 week ago

Growing up in South Florida during the disappearance of Adam Walsh, I am terrified to let my kids go anywhere.

BrodyStone21
2
1 week ago

I can't go on dates with my girlfriend

dab attack cuz life's great

Heywhitefriend
2
1 week ago

For real. I'm only 20 and my friends basically fucked around in mines and almost got lost in forests all the time and my parents really just didn't mind but in hindsight they should have.

Sum-Dude-on-Reddit
2
1 week ago

I skated as a kid and my mom would let me just Go off into town to skate the local spots alone, I told her there's always other skaters around but that shit was dangerous

hungrydano
2
1 week ago

This idea will be probably be a source of contention for my wife and I if we have kids.

She grew up in a very loving and attentive environment that was born out of affection, not helicoptering. I on the other hand was pretty much a latch key kid who always wanted more independence (mom was pretty helicoptery when she was around probably to make up for lost time), which has kind of driven a wedge between the emotional connection I have with my parents.

Hopefully we can give our potential kids the option to explore the neighborhood on their own/go on little adventures with their friends while also nurturing a positive relationship at home.

DoctorWaluigiTime
2
1 week ago

Helicopter parents existed "back in the day."

Less-hovering parents exist today.

virmeretrix
2
1 week ago

When I was 8-10 I would leave the house on my bike without telling anyone. My mother was never really bothered by it lmao

D3Construct
2
1 week ago

Me: "We found a dead body!"

Mom: "Well you can play more tomorrow sweetie, now wash up, dinner's ready."

9away
2
1 week ago

back when if someone got hurt we made blood pacts not to snitch, because if the parents found out we wouldnt get to do that activity any more.

razorbacks3129
2
1 week ago

And yet the kids are called the snowflake generation

Vatrumyr
2
1 week ago

I remember those days where I was locked out of the house. "Its nice out, go play outside, drink from the hose, don't come back till dinner" -- kinda thing.

-----deleted--------
2
1 week ago

100% This.

I grew up in the 60's and 70's and that is how life worked. 😊

LumbermanDan
2
1 week ago

"Head home when the streetlights come on"

Muhryzzle
2
1 week ago

I told my kids about when my older brother went into the jungle with some other kids and got lost in like 1993. They asked why they didn't call for help.

RenatoValsecchi
2
1 week ago

Abductor of child calls: i have your daughter. Me: Tell her dinner‘s at 5.

BabyStockholmSyndrom
2
1 week ago

On a positive anecdote, the teens and kids I know have much better and closer relationships with their parents than when I grew up. Parents are way more receptive and communicative. And that's partly because parents are more involved emotionally now than before.

-_-NAME-_-
2
1 week ago

10 yr old Me: I'm leaving to an undisclosed location

Mom: Close the door you're letting the cold air out.

red-bearded
2
1 week ago

I didn’t even tell my mom where I was going. If I showed up at home too early she’d say, “why are you here?” Then kick me out of the house.

lawnpuppies
2
1 week ago

It's interesting when you know that other people don't know that they don't know. It creates a different frame of reference, to be free to explore the world on your own as a child. Not saying it's better, but they think completely different than people who weren't allowed to. Even people who were free to wander vary depending on the level of freedom and when they were allowed that freedom.

Tizbi
2
1 week ago

Is it usual for people to eat dinner that early?

LordGorzul
2
1 week ago

Dinner at 5? Wtf

duncecap_
2
1 week ago

I used to literally explore sewers with my friend, lucky we didn't find pennywise....or hepatitis

OnlyThotsRibbit
2
1 week ago

The fuck dinner at 5?!

new_account_5009
2
1 week ago

When I was maybe 11 or 12, I had broken my hand doing some dumb stuff at a summer camp, so I had to wear a cast. Our family took a trip to the beach, but unfortunately, I couldn't swim or the cast would get wet. I wasn't having any fun at the beach, so I begged my parents to go mini-golfing by myself. They had to watch my younger brother and sister at the beach, so they gave me a few bucks and told me how the city bus system worked. Sure enough, I hopped on the bus and figured it out. I played a few rounds and went back to the hotel a couple hours later in time for dinner. This was before cell phones were a thing, so I just had to deal with it on my own. I didn't think anything of it at the time, but I couldn't imagine that happening nowadays.

PM_ME_STEAMGAEMZ
2
1 week ago

Who the fuck has dinner at 5?!

greenSixx
2
1 week ago

People with bedtime at 8pm.

1forNo2forYes
2
1 week ago

Worst part???? The world is a safer place today than it was back then

dbx99
2
1 week ago

Get the heart monitor app that will ping your Alexa enabled device every 20 seconds. Then get that tracking GPS enabled RFID implant